Jump to Main ContentJump to Primary Navigation

Yavneh top Jewish school for sixth-form progress

Four Jewish schools in top 100 for progress scores up to GCSE in new performance tables

    Yavneh College has topped the league tables for Jewish schools at A-level
    Yavneh College has topped the league tables for Jewish schools at A-level

    Yavneh College was ranked 25th out of 4,417 English schools for progress made by pupils between GCSE and A-level in new national performances published by the Department for Education.

    The state-aided Orthodox school in Hertfordshire received a sixth-form progress score of 0.65 (0 being average).

    For progress from entry to GCSE, one Charedi girls’ school, Menorah High in Dollis Hill, was in the top ten schools nationally, while another, Beis Yaakov in Salford, in the top 60. Both Hasmonean and JFS reached the top 100.

    Spencer Lewis, headteacher of Yavneh, said: “We are so proud of how well our pupils did last year, both at GCSE and at A-level. In particular, the progress that Yavneh College pupils make in the time that they are with us is a testament to their hard work and that of the staff who work with them.”

    As well as Yavneh, JFS was rated “well above average” for sixth-form progress with a score of 0.41, while JCoSS and King David High School Manchester were both classified as above-average with 0.22 and 0.17 respectively.

    JFS, Yavneh, Hasmonean, King David Manchester, King David Liverpool, Beis Yaakov, Yesodey Hatorah Senior Girls and Menorah High all were ranked as “well above average” by the DfE for progress made by pupils from entry to GCSE. JCoSS and Kantor King Solomon High were listed as “above average”.

    Menorah High was seventh out of 6,323 schools for its progress score of 1.25 up to GCSE, with Beis Yaakov at  joint 53rd with a score of 0.9; Hasmonean joint 78th with 0.84; and JFS joint 94th with 0.81.  

    The figures suggest children enjoy good teaching in Jewish schools since many are doing better in exams than might have been predicted when they started school.

    However, the results do not say whether children may have improved exam grades through private tuition.

    This year, there are even more performance statistics than before because the DfE offers figures for pass-rates at the new grade 4 in English and maths as well as at grade 5.

    Even so, the bare numbers do not always tell the true story. Mesivta, a Charedi boys’ school in Manchester, has an artificially low progress score because pupils take GCSEs a year early — and so  recorded passes for English and maths at the old C grade or above rather than the new 4 or above passes, which now count since last summer. (Mesivta was in the top five per cent of schools for progress in last year’s tables with a score of 0.61.)

    Immanuel College is not listed in our GCSE table because pupils take several iGCSEs (international GCSEs) which are not recognised by the DfE.
    While some Charedi girls’ schools perform well at GCSE, few of their pupils go on to take A-levels. 

    Even in the more conservative Strictly Orthodox sector, pupils at independent girls schools such as Beis Malka or Beis Chinuch Lebonos in Hackney achieve slightly better than average attainment for English schools at GCSE.

    But many Charedi boys do not take a single GCSE.

    According to the “attainment 8” measure, based on pupils’ eight best GCSE results including maths and English, Jewish schools were the top-performing faith group with 58.6 points (ahead of Muslim schools with 56.6).

    TABLE EXPLANATION:

    A-level

    Progress score: measures progress made from GCSE to A-level. A positive score means pupils performed above average given predictions from GCSE results

    GCSE:

    Progress 8: measures progress made since starting school. A score of 0.50 points means children achieved on average half-a-grade higher at GCSE than would have been predicted on entry

    Attainment 8: consists of one English and one maths GCSE (which count double), three other English Baccalaureate subjects like geography, science or history, and then the three best scores in other subjects 

    English/Maths: percentage of children gaining GCSE in English and Maths at grade 4 pass or above

    EBacc: percentage gaining English Baccalaureate —  English and maths at a grade 5 pass, two science, history or geography plus one language

Education news

Applications soar to Herts primaries

Simon Rocker

16:25

Applications soar to Herts primaries
Education news

Lords backs Ofsted on LGBT education

Simon Rocker

Wed, 11:50

Lords backs Ofsted on LGBT education
Community News

It's a roll over: Morrisons taps Charedi market with special range

Simon Rocker

Friday, April 13, 2018

It's a roll over: Morrisons taps Charedi market with special range
UK News

Candidate for BoD presidency issues manifesto

Simon Rocker

11:25

Candidate for BoD presidency issues manifesto
Education news

No word yet on future of King Solomon head

Simon Rocker

Mon, 14:53

No word yet on future of King Solomon head
UK News

Scale of community's London housing crisis revealed

Simon Rocker

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Scale of community's London housing crisis revealed
Blogs

How should we celebrate Yom Haatzmaut?

The JC Comment Blog

Simon Rocker

Yesterday, 14:46

How should we celebrate Yom Haatzmaut?
News Features

Jewish life flourishes across the Commonwealth

Simon Rocker

Mon, 14:32

Jewish life flourishes across the Commonwealth
UK News

Jewish traditions under 'unprecedented attack'

Simon Rocker

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Jewish traditions under 'unprecedented attack'