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Having guests at Seder

"This is the bread of affliction ... let all who are hungry come and eat."

    "This is the bread of affliction ... let all who are hungry come and eat." So begins the retelling of the Exodus on the Seder night. When we are weighed down with worries and problems, we are less available to care for others, to notice who may be hungry. Beginning our Seder with an invitation to everyone means that at least for one night, we will make the choice to put our preoccupations to one side and open ourselves to those around us, even to people we have never met before.

    Rabbi Joseph Soloveichik taught that being open to guests involves being open to their opinions, to hearing new ideas. What better evening to open yourself to new perspectives than the Seder, when we inject new meaning into the ideas of release from bondage and freedom?

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