Jump to Main ContentJump to Primary Navigation

Review: Leonard Cohen

    O2 Arena, SE10


    Age has not affected the ability of the legendary Canadian to hit the same four notes


    Age can be a scourge on the best singers, with years of strain and heavy use the cause of notable deterioration in range and tone.

    Not so, however, the iconic voice of Leonard Cohen. As he demonstrated to rapt audience at the O2 Arena in London’s Docklands last week, the owner of one of the world’s most loved, but limited, baritone voices can still hit the same three or four notes with which he has been disarming his fans since the release of his first album in the ’60s.

    It has been widely reported that Cohen was pressed into undertaking his current tour — his first in many years — by financial hardship.

    But as he jogged on stage with a beaming wide grin, there was no evidence of anything but his desire to perform.

    Of course, it would have been a struggle for him to disappoint the assembled dedicated fans, who ranged from the legendary Canadian’s contemporaries to those who could be his grandchildren.

    Though some of the saxophone riffs in his songs from the ’80s sounded a  little dated, Cohen’s repertoire by and large stands the test of time. Backed by a large band of talented singers and musicians, he surpassed expectations, fitting in all of his essential songs, from Chelsea Hotel to Suzanne to First We Take Manhattan.

    Cohen’s abilities as a songwriter and lyricist have always more than compensated for his less-than-excellent singing voice. This was particularly evident when he performed A Thousand Kisses Deep without backing music, reciting the lyrics in his sonorous speaking voice, a reminder that before he began to set his words to music he had already been recognised as one of Canada’s most gifted young poets.

    Hallelujah is constantly covered by musicians who are far better singers than Cohen, but this was rendered moot as Cohen performed it himself, drawing tears to most of the eyes of his captivated audience.

    He is due to perform again in London in November — not to be missed.

Music

She's 90, but the music keeps playing

Anonymous

Thursday, November 17, 2016

She's 90, but the music keeps playing
Music

A triumph of Dylanology

Bryan Cheyette

Friday, October 21, 2016

A triumph of Dylanology
Music

The classical star inspired by astrology

Rosa Doherty

Thursday, October 6, 2016

The classical star inspired by astrology
Music

The family who are always in harmony

Jessica Duchen

Thursday, November 10, 2016

The family who are always in harmony
Music

Be in no doubt: Bob Dylan changed literature

Stoddard Martin

Thursday, October 20, 2016

Be in no doubt: Bob Dylan changed literature
Music

Craig's bid for a serious comeback

Elisa Bray

Thursday, September 29, 2016

Craig's bid for a serious comeback
Music

Barry Kosky: A kangaroo with a nose for opera

Jessica Duchen

Friday, October 21, 2016

Barry Kosky: A kangaroo with a nose for opera
Music

Crossing borders in music and life

Jessica Duchen

Thursday, October 13, 2016

Crossing borders in music and life
Music

Sophie finds her voice - in Russia

Joseph Finlay

Thursday, September 29, 2016

Sophie finds her voice - in Russia