Jump to Main ContentJump to Primary Navigation

Hitler's bunker recreated in Berlin museum

Curators of a Berlin museum design painstaking reconstruction of Führer's bunker as an aid to address worrying ignorance about Nazism

    The recreation of the bunker in which Hitler killed himself is the controversial centrepiece of a new museum
    The recreation of the bunker in which Hitler killed himself is the controversial centrepiece of a new museum Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images

    Adolf Hitler's final bunker has long been destroyed and buried forever, but a full-size replica now exists in Berlin intended as a monument to the downfall of the Nazi regime.
     
    The model of the bunker is the controversial centrepiece of a new private museum, named "How Could it Happen", which opened this spring in a former World War II air raid shelter close to the location where Hitler killed himself in 1945. 

    The historians behind the museum say they have been accused of building a "Hitler Disney" but countered that the museum is intended to address worrying ignorance as to the realities of the Nazi regime, and to show the depths to which a civilization in the thralls of a dictatorship can fall. 
     
    Enno Lenze, a guide and board member of the museum, told The Times that he had frequently been asked questions demonstrating exceptionally low awareness of issues related to the Third Reich. 

    “A common question we get is why the Jews financed Hitler even though he was against them,” Lenze said. “Another frequent question is who drove the Nazis into the bunkers to gas them. Those questions came from teachers.”

    Wieland Giebel, the museum's designer and curator, defended the painstaking recreation of the bunker, which includes a grandfather clock, floral sofa and an oxygen tank. 

    "This room is where the crimes ended, where everything ended, so that's why we're showing it," Giebel told Reuters. The bunker is behind glass and protected by video cameras. Visitors are forbidden from taking photographs.

    The museum, which took four months to build and cost a reported €1.3 million, tells Hitler's complete life story, using 2,300 images, including 800 that have not been shown in public before.

World

Pursue death squad suspects now, Nazi hunter says

Toby Axelrod

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Pursue death squad suspects now, Nazi hunter says
Analysis

Berlin's tale of hate that shocked the world

Toby Axelrod

Thursday, April 6, 2017

Berlin's tale of hate that shocked the world
World

Berlin launches first-ever Jewish food week

Toby Axelrod

Monday, March 20, 2017

Berlin launches first-ever Jewish food week
World

Is Berlin's mayor one of world's worst antisemites?

Toby Axelrod

Monday, September 4, 2017

Is Berlin's mayor one of world's worst antisemites?
World

Jewish leader lobbies school over antisemitic bullying

Toby Axelrod

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Jewish leader lobbies school over antisemitic bullying
World

Member of right-wing party faces expulsion for disparaging Shoah memorial

Toby Axelrod

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Member of right-wing party faces expulsion for disparaging Shoah memorial
World

Artist taking on dark side of Luther’s legacy

Toby Axelrod

Friday, June 23, 2017

Artist taking on dark side of Luther’s legacy
World

Pupil leaves school over antisemitic abuse

Toby Axelrod

Friday, March 24, 2017

Pupil leaves school over antisemitic abuse
World

Israeli woman missing after Berlin terror declared dead

Toby Axelrod

Thursday, December 22, 2016

Israeli woman missing after Berlin terror declared dead