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Iconic Einstein photo sold at auction for £95,000

The Hebrew University stands to benefit from the current sale, as Einstein bequeathed his estate to the Jerusalem institution.

    The famous picture, showing Einstein sticking his tongue out, has become a cultural icon, seen here on a t-shirt (Credit: Amazon.com)

    A famous photo of Albert Einstein sticking out his tongue at a photographer and signed by the renowned scientist has been sold for $125,000 (£95,000), an auction house in Los Angeles has announced.

    UPI (United Press International) photographer Arthur Sasse took the picture on March 14, 1951, while covering a birthday party for Einstein, given by his colleagues at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton University.

    Einstein was tired of smiling for photographers at the party and when Sasse renewed the request, the scientist stuck out his tongue instead.

    Initially, UPI editors hesitated to publish the irreverent photo, but when they did Einstein was so amused that he ordered nine prints to give to close friends.

    The $125,000 selling price, which equalled the minimum bid level set by the auction house, reflected the photo’s enhanced value through Einstein’s own signature on the margin.

    Also, while the photo is generally shown cropped with only Einstein in the picture, the auctioned version represents the original, with Einstein seated between his hosts, Dr Frank Aydelotte, head of the Princeton Institute, and his wife.

    As per company policy, the Nate D Sanders auction house did not reveal the buyer’s identity.

    The 7” x 10” photo was previously on the market in 2009, when it was sold at auction for $74,324.

    The Hebrew University stands to benefit from the current sale, as Einstein bequeathed his estate, including the use of his image, to the Jerusalem institution.

    Einstein’s March 14 birthday continues to be celebrated in Princeton as “Pi Day” because the date corresponds to 3.14, the first three digits of the number Pi.

    Einstein, who died in 1955, assisted numerous Jewish institutions and organisations during his lifetime, including JTA, the Jewish Telegraphic Agency.

    In the 1930s and 1940s, he helped to raise money for the global wire service, was photographed inspecting its printing press, and carried on a correspondence with JTA founder Jacob Landau.

    Remarkably, Einstein’s name has retained its universal recognition as a synonym for supreme intelligence. The National Geographic television channel has just concluded its series, titled “Genius,” with Geoffrey Rush and Johnny Flynn as the older and younger Einstein respectively.

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