Jump to Main ContentJump to Primary Navigation

Europe's Jews face dual-threat: far-right parties and increased Islamic extremism from migrants

Security specialists and politicians gathered at a conference in Hungary to discuss anti-semitic threats

    Members of the far-right Jobbik party
    Members of the far-right Jobbik party

    Europe's Jews are facing a dual threat from the rise of far-right political parties, such as Jobbik in Hungary, and from the increase of Islamic extremism amongst newly absorbed migrant communities, a conference has warned.

    The uncertain future for European Jewry was discussed in depth at a gathering of politicians, communal leaders and security experts in Budapest, Hungary, on Wednesday.

    Speaking ahead of the conference Mr Kalman Szalai, the secretary of The Action and Protection Foundation (TEV) who organised the event, said:  “This is an extremely important gathering for European Jewry."

    "The two biggest challenges to Europe today will be discussed: migration and terrorism. Both have a serious impact on the Jewish community.

    "Here in Hungary, we face an additional challenge from an extreme right party, the Jobbik, which has built its base on spreading racial hatred and antisemitism, and today is using the general frustration of voters to gain favour.

    "Education is the only way to form an inclusive society and we hope that this conference will be part of that solution.”

    Also speaking at the event  - which was themed Is there a future for Jews in Europe?-  was Community Security Trust director Mike Whine, who said that migration from the Middle East into Europe was necessary because of population decline in several European countries.

    But Mr Whine said the challenge revolved around whether large scale immigration could be achieved without threatening the established European values and at the same time by making migrants feel welcomed in their new home.

    He told the JC: "The challenge facing Jewish communities and their governments is how to successfully absorb new immigrant communities without allowing antisemitism to rise as result, given that some of this immigration comes from countries where antisemitism is relatively common.

    "This can be done through a combination of education and by applying laws against racism and hate crime."

    The conference in Budapest
    The conference in Budapest
    The conference revolved around a series of lectures and panel discussions regarding how migration patterns effect European identity, the rise of anti-semitic incidents and how they are measured and how young people are adapting to anti-semitic threats.

    Dr Istvánv Mikola, Hungarian Minister of State for Security Policy and International Cooperation, also attended the conference to discuss the rise of far-right extremism and antisemitism in his country ahead of the 2018 general election.

    Polls have continued to show the far-right Jobbik party in second place, behind current Prime Minister Viktorn Orbán's Fidesz party.

    Under Gábor Vona's leadership Jobbik have repeatedly made openly antisemitic statements and threats.

    However Hungary's ruling Fidesz party has also moved toward further right-wing positions with PM Orban's government adopting an anti-immigration position and building a wall on Hungary's southern border.

    Also speaking at Wednesday's event were Eli Hazan, Foreign Affairs Secretary of the Likud Party of Israel.

UK News

Semi-pro footballer in 'antisemitic abuse' fury

Lee Harpin

11:58

Semi-pro footballer in 'antisemitic abuse' fury
UK News

Police say rabbi in fraud case still under investigation

Lee Harpin

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Police say rabbi in fraud case still under investigation
UK News

Police drop rabbi fraud case probe

Lee Harpin

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Police drop rabbi fraud case probe
News Features

Mental illness? Here’s 
how we can cope

Lee Harpin

Rosa Doherty

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Mental illness? Here’s 
how we can cope
UK News

Labour NEC winner condemns anti-Zionist academic

Lee Harpin

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Labour NEC winner condemns anti-Zionist academic
UK News

Far-left move to control Labour antisemitism hearings panel

Lee Harpin

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Far-left move to control Labour antisemitism hearings panel
UK News

Sir Anish Kapoor gives £750, 000 prize to refugee charities

Lee Harpin

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Sir Anish Kapoor gives £750, 000 prize to refugee charities
UK News

JLM raise concerns over Labour NEC poll winner

Lee Harpin

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

JLM raise concerns over Labour NEC poll winner
Columnists

Shame those who spread prejudice

Melanie Phillips

Thursday, January 4, 2018

Shame those who spread prejudice