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The chaplaincy that students rely upon

    As the range of issues dealt with by University Jewish Chaplaincy rises, so does the strain on its resources.

    Executive director Rabbi Yoni Sherizen warns that UJC faces "a real challenge" to maintain the services of its nine-chaplain network to an estimated 3,500 Jewish students.

    The charity has been forced significantly to increase fundraising efforts over the past year, and Rabbi Sherizen acknowledges that generating almost £1 million will be difficult in the prevailing financial climate.

    UJC aims to ensure that students receive the practical, spiritual and welfare assistance they need.

    Chaplains work closely with the Union of Jewish Students, Hillel and Jewish societies to strengthenJewish identity, provide quality Jewish education and boost the activities available for Jewish students.

    Chaplains are based at the university with the largest Jewish student population in their region, but travel regularly to smaller campuses and work to involve those isolated from the mainstream in wider events.

    "This encourages students to mix," Rabbi Sherizen explains. "We want to unite students to promote a bigger picture than just their local J-Soc."

    UJC sees one of most important aspects as combating hostility on campuses - for example, standing up to antisemitism and helping individuals who are victims of discrimination. In such cases, the chaplains can offer a "comforting voice".
    In recent times, UJC chaplains have also faced an upsurge in welfare-related problems. Rabbi Sherizen points out that one-in-five students seeks help for depression during the first half of the course, and Jews at university are no exception. At the extreme end, they have been called upon to deal with self-harm and even suicide attempts. "We have seen a number of very unpleasant cases recently and, when they happen, we have to drop everything and be at the student's doorstep."
    UJS chairman Adam Pike believes the JC Charity Appeal judges made a wise decision to back the chaplaincy service. "The charity is an invaluable supporter and partner to Jewish students, J-Socs and UJS. Every penny UJC receives will ensure more meaningful Jewish campus experiences."

     

     As the range of issues dealt with by University Jewish Chaplaincy rises, so does the strain on its resources.
    Executive director Rabbi Yoni Sherizen warns that UJC faces "a real challenge" to maintain the services of its nine-chaplain network to an estimated 3,500 Jewish students.
    The charity has been forced significantly to increase fundraising efforts over the past year, and Rabbi Sherizen acknowledges that generating almost £1 million will be difficult in the prevailing financial climate.
    UJC aims to ensure that students receive the practical, spiritual and welfare assistance they need. Chaplains work closely with the Union of Jewish Students, Hillel and Jewish societies to strengthen Jewish identity, provide quality Jewish education and boost the activities available for Jewish students.

    Chaplains are based at the university with the largest Jewish student population in their region, but travel regularly to smaller campuses and work to involve those isolated from the mainstream in wider events.
    "This encourages students to mix," Rabbi Sherizen explains. "We want to unite students to promote a bigger picture than just their local J-Soc."

    UJC sees one of most important aspects as combating hostility on campuses - for example, standing up to antisemitism and helping individuals who are victims of discrimination. In such cases, the chaplains can offer a "comforting voice".

    In recent times, UJC chaplains have also faced an upsurge in welfare-related problems. Rabbi Sherizen points out that one-in-five students seeks help for depression during the first half of the course, and Jews at university are no exception. At the extreme end, they have been called upon to deal with self-harm and even suicide attempts. "We have seen a number of very unpleasant cases recently and, when they happen, we have to drop everything and be at the student's doorstep."

    UJS chairman Adam Pike believes the JC Charity Appeal judges made a wise decision to back the chaplaincy service. "The charity is an invaluable supporter and partner to Jewish students, J-Socs and UJS. Every penny UJC receives will ensure more meaningful Jewish campus experiences."

    As the range of issues dealt with by University Jewish Chaplaincy rises, so does the strain on its resources.

    Executive director Rabbi Yoni Sherizen warns that UJC faces "a real challenge" to maintain the services of its nine-chaplain network to an estimated 3,500 Jewish students.

    The charity has been forced significantly to increase fundraising efforts over the past year, and Rabbi Sherizen acknowledges that generating almost £1 million will be difficult in the prevailing financial climate.

    UJC aims to ensure that students receive the practical, spiritual and welfare assistance they need.

    Chaplains work closely with the Union of Jewish Students, Hillel and Jewish societies to strengthen Jewish identity, provide quality Jewish education and boost the activities available for Jewish students.

    Chaplains are based at the university with the largest Jewish student population in their region, but travel regularly to smaller campuses and work to involve those isolated from the mainstream in wider events.

    "This encourages students to mix," Rabbi Sherizen explains. "We want to unite students to promote a bigger picture than just their local J-Soc."

    UJC sees one of most important aspects as combating hostility on campuses - for example, standing up to antisemitism and helping individuals who are victims of discrimination. In such cases, the chaplains can offer a "comforting voice".

    In recent times, UJC chaplains have also faced an upsurge in welfare-related problems. Rabbi Sherizen points out that one-in-five students seeks help for depression during the first half of the course, and Jews at university are no exception. At the extreme end, they have been called upon to deal with self-harm and even suicide attempts. "We have seen a number of very unpleasant cases recently and, when they happen, we have to drop everything and be at the student's doorstep."

    UJS chairman Adam Pike believes the JC Charity Appeal judges made a wise decision to back the chaplaincy service. "The charity is an invaluable supporter and partner to Jewish students, J-Socs and UJS. Every penny UJC receives will ensure more meaningful Jewish campus experiences."

    A day in the life of a student chaplain

    Rabbi Alan Garber is one of UJC's busiest chaplains, covering universities in five cities across the Yorkshire and Humberside region.

    In addition to helping students in Leeds, where he is based, he travels to Sheffield, Bradford, York and Hull.

    "This morning I was at a meeting to support a student who had a misunderstanding with his exam results and had to meet the vice-chancellor of the university," he explains. "Afterwards I had some interfaith work and then I worked on the J-Soc stall at the freshers' fair."

    His assistance covers all Jewish backgrounds, and a key pre-Yomtov task has been arranging festival services for Progressive students in the region.

    Support our three charities

    UNIVERSITY JEWISH CHAPLAINCY
    Donations can be made by post to PO Box 47824, London NW11 9YA; by phone on 020 8731 7471; or online at www.ujc.org.uk. Registered charity number 261324

    CHAI CANCER CARE
    Donations can be made by post to Chai Cancer Care, 144-146 Great North Way, London NW4 1EH; by phone on 020 8202 2211; or online at www.chaicancercare.org. Registered charity number 1078956

    JEWISH WOMEN'S AID
    Donations can be made by post to PO Box 2670, London N12 9ZE; by phone on 020 8445 8060; or online at www.jwa.org.uk. Registered charity number 1047045

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