Jump to Main ContentJump to Primary Navigation

Turning at Lecha Dodi

    There are places in the siddur where one feels that the actions and stage directions instructed once encoded greater drama than we can currently muster. An example is the climax of the Kabbalat Shabbat prayers on Friday evening when we sing the great liturgical poem Lecha Dodi by the 16th-century kabbalist, Rabbi Shlomo Alkabetz.

    The final stanza welcomes the Shabbat, which is compared to a bride: "Come forward in peace, crown of her husband." Singing this section, we stand up and turn to the west, the direction of the sunset, as though the bride had just swept into synagogue from there. At the closing words, we bow and greet the Shabbat Bride. Can we feel the thrill of excitement and anticipation at her arrival that those who instituted the custom apparently experienced?

Jewish ways

Not sleeping on Rosh Hashanah

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Not sleeping on Rosh Hashanah
Jewish ways

Censoring Aleinu

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Censoring Aleinu
Jewish ways

Can you eat a veggie cheeseburger?

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Thursday, July 30, 2015

Can you eat a veggie cheeseburger?
Jewish ways

Reading the ketubah

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Reading the ketubah
Jewish ways

Reciting psalm 27 in Ellul

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Reciting psalm 27 in Ellul
Jewish ways

Havdalah before Tishah B'av

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Havdalah before Tishah B'av
Jewish ways

Thirteen Attributes

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Thirteen Attributes
Jewish ways

Dedicating a new home

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Dedicating a new home
Jewish ways

Spilling wine at Havdalah

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Spilling wine at Havdalah