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The Hebrew Calendar

If you ask the average Jew what year it is, she would probably say, "2015" rather than "5775".

    If you ask the average Jew what year it is, she would probably say, "2015" rather than "5775". Most Jews think of time in terms of the Gregorian rather than Jewish calendar. Is this a problem? It might seem so. The first commandment Israel received as a nation was to sanctify the new month (Exodus 12:2), to mark time according to the lunar cycle. Rabbi Moshe Sofer (1762 -1839), banned the use of Gregorian dates because the year is supposed to mark the birth of Jesus and the names of the months derive from pagan gods. However, Rabbi Ovadia Yosef, who was Israel's Sephardi Chief Rabbi, permitted the use of secular dates as the link to Christianity was tenuous.

    Modern Zionism embraced Hebrew dating as an expression of a return to Jewish roots. Today in Israel, it is legal to date cheques according to the Hebrew calendar and every newspaper bears both the Hebrew and secular date.

Jewish ways

Not sleeping on Rosh Hashanah

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Not sleeping on Rosh Hashanah
Jewish ways

Censoring Aleinu

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Censoring Aleinu
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Can you eat a veggie cheeseburger?

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Thursday, July 30, 2015

Can you eat a veggie cheeseburger?
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Reading the ketubah

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Reading the ketubah
Jewish ways

Reciting psalm 27 in Ellul

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Reciting psalm 27 in Ellul
Jewish ways

Havdalah before Tishah B'av

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Havdalah before Tishah B'av
Jewish ways

Thirteen Attributes

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Thirteen Attributes
Jewish ways

Dedicating a new home

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Dedicating a new home
Jewish ways

Spilling wine at Havdalah

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Spilling wine at Havdalah