Jump to Main ContentJump to Primary Navigation

Reading the ketubah

    Between the giving of the ring, and singing the Seven Blessings, there is a rather less accessible item of the wedding ceremony, reading the ketubah. The Ketubah is traditionally read in Aramaic, which is incomprehensible these days except to a talmudically learned crowd, but may equally be read in Hebrew or English translations.

    The traditional ketubah details the groom's obligations to the bride, mostly of a financial nature, his commitment to support her in a dignified manner and the amount that she will receive in the event of his death or divorce. There is some debate whether the ketubah is mandated by the Torah or whether it was a rabbinic innovation. Those who take the latter view say that the reason was so that divorce should not be quick, easy or thoughtless for the husband as he would be liable to a significant payment.

    Although the sums mandated in the traditional ketubah are not used today as the basis of divorce settlements, it is still meaningful for the groom to
    publicly affirm specific commitments to support his
    wife at the wedding.

Jewish ways

Not sleeping on Rosh Hashanah

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Not sleeping on Rosh Hashanah
Jewish ways

Reciting psalm 27 in Ellul

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Reciting psalm 27 in Ellul
Jewish ways

Havdalah before Tishah B'av

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Havdalah before Tishah B'av
Jewish ways

Thirteen Attributes

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Thirteen Attributes
Jewish ways

Dedicating a new home

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Dedicating a new home
Jewish ways

Spilling wine at Havdalah

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Spilling wine at Havdalah
Jewish ways

Censoring Aleinu

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Censoring Aleinu
Jewish ways

Can you eat a veggie cheeseburger?

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Thursday, July 30, 2015

Can you eat a veggie cheeseburger?
Jewish ways

Thirty days of mourning

Rabbi Julian Sinclair

Thirty days of mourning