Brigit Grant

Reviews: Bridge Of Spies and My Skinny Sister

By Brigit Grant, November 26, 2015

Bridge of Spies (12A)
★★★★✩

My Skinny Sister (12A)
★★★✩✩

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No joke, we've got the funniest films

By Brigit Grant, November 19, 2015

Last week, the Writers Guild of America announced the 101 funniest screenplays ever written and gave the Jews good reason to kvell from ear to ear.

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Review: My Nazi Legacy

By Brigit Grant, November 19, 2015

What terrible thing would your father have to do to make you admit he was a monster? For most people, discovering he was responsible for the murder of 75,000 innocent men, women and children would be enough, but not Horst von Wächter.

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Review: The Lady in The Van

By Brigit Grant, November 12, 2015

If Dame is the highest honour that can be bestowed upon an actress then it's time they came up with something extra for Maggie Smith. Make her a double Dame if necessary, as her performance as The Lady in the Van warrants it. And though he declined the Order of the Knight in 1998, playwright Alan Bennett will always be a Sir to me.

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Review: Burnt

By Brigit Grant, November 5, 2015

As the hottest dish in Hollywood, Bradley Cooper is definitely the right guy to play chef Adam Jones in John Wells's Burnt. When I first interviewed the then young Marco Pierre White, he was a lot like Adam. Arrogant, shouty, ingredient-obsessed with no tableside manner, he terrified diners but beguiled them with his genius cooking.

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Rebels with a cause

By Brigit Grant, October 29, 2015

Life imitating art imitating life may be a cultural cliché but, when it comes to Nae Caranfil's Closer to the Moon, it really does the job.

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Review: The Vatican Tapes

By Brigit Grant, October 29, 2015

With Spectre on the landscape, only the bravest of distributors was prepared to take on the might of James Bond this week. But if the latest 007 is sold out, there's The Vatican Tapes.

Signature Entertainment, which was founded four years ago by Marc Goldberg, has been brave enough to go up against Bond and provide the horror-fix for Halloween.

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Plane wonderful

By Brigit Grant, October 22, 2015

Paper Planes (12A)
Children don't get nearly as much attention as they deserve at the cinema. They remain the untapped captive audience due to the small number of films released specifically for them.

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Review: Hotel Transylvania 2

By Brigit Grant, October 15, 2015

Sometimes it's easy to spot a Jewish cartoon character. Herschel Krustofsky aka Krusty the Clown of The Simpsons or South Park kid Kyle Broslofski. Where it gets tricky is with Gru in Despicable Me, as he has an Eastern European accent, hook nose and overbearing mother, but has yet to come clean about his ancestry.

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Comedian Ashley Blaker: My unorthodox life in Little Britain

By Brigit Grant, October 14, 2015

When you picture a stand-up comedian, Ashley Blaker isn't the first person that comes to mind. Sure, he has a beard like a lot of laughter merchants on the circuit but, unlike them, he also has peyot and wears tzitit, rarely sighted at The Comedy Store.

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Review: Addicted to Fresno

By Brigit Grant, October 8, 2015

Admitting to one's enjoyment of a bad-taste movie can be as risky as revealing one's political allegiance (unless it's to the far-left).

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Review: Mia Madre

By Brigit Grant, September 24, 2015

It feels like only yesterday that I was watching writer, director and actor Nanni Moretti zip around Italy on his moped in his delightfully witty and whimsical travelogue, Dear Diary.

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Review: Bill

By Brigit Grant, September 17, 2015

I can't say I've given a lot of thought to Shakespeare's "lost years". Mulling over ideas for the 37 plays and 154 sonnets that he would compose in the "claimed" years would almost certainly have taken up more than a few weekends, yet that crucial period between obscurity in Stratford-upon- Avon and fame in London remains a mystery. Until now.

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Review: 45 Years

By Brigit Grant, August 27, 2015

In the week leading up to her 45th wedding anniversary, Kate (Charlotte Rampling) is as busy as any hostess organising a party would be. Granted any Jewish hostess would be confused (hysterical) at the fact she has left confirming the function room, menu and buying her dress until a few days before. But smoked salmon starters and matching accessories are not an issue for Kate.

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Review: Absolutely Anything

By Brigit Grant, August 20, 2015

I'm a bit slow with this review as Absolutely Anything opened last week. But August is the silly season and this is a film that truly fits the bill as it is spectacularly silly, a tad saucy and yet suitable for the whole family to giggle at together.

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Review: The Gift

By Brigit Grant, August 6, 2015

I was rather hoping the press notes for The Gift would contain an embargo preventing reviewers from revealing the twist in the tale. A lot of critics have a laissez-faire attitude to spoilers and the extended trailers in cinemas give away far more than they should, which deprives audiences of experiencing movies as they happen.

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Review: Iris

By Brigit Grant, July 30, 2015

The name Iris Apfel won't mean a lot to you unless you sit in the front row during Fashion Week, but once you set eyes on her in the late Albert Maysles' documentary, you'll be reluctant to let her go.

Like the late, great Joan Rivers, Iris is another fabulous New York Jewess with no filter, though it is couture not comedy that occupies the life of this eccentric 89-year-old who rose to fame in

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Review: Southpaw

By Brigit Grant, July 23, 2015

Super-pumped and six-packed Jewish actor Jake Gyllenhaal sweats testosterone in Antoine Fuqua's Southpaw and could probably floor heavyweight Wladimir Klitschko with all the training he did to play boxer Billy "The Great" Hope. The rule of thumb (or fist) for boxing movies is to build a tale of triumph over tragedy around a likeable, but not infallible fighter and the template works.

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Review: Best of Enemies

By Brigit Grant, July 23, 2015

Best of Enemies presents the war of words that took place between liberal author and social commentator Gore Vidal and right-wing zealot and talk show host, Bill Buckley in 1968.

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Review: Ruth and Alex

By Brigit Grant, July 16, 2015

Films about elderly people moving house because they can't handle the stairs don't come along very often. It's a tough concept to pitch to a studio executive. But silver surfers searching for an apartment with a lift clearly rang true for somebody as it is the story of Ruth & Alex - and I know a lot of people who will really enjoy it.

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