Anthea Gerrie

Beaumont Hotel

By Anthea Gerrie, April 2, 2015

A century after Mr Selfridge opened his emporium, top-drawer elegance has returned to Oxford Street with what may be London's most beautiful new boutique hotel.

Avoiding the tourist tat shops, cross over from Selfridges' main entrance and head down Balderton Street till a robot stops you in your tracks.


Balaboosta does Seder

By Anthea Gerrie, March 19, 2015

Passover dinner for 55? When you're used to catering family Seders for almost that many - and happen to be a chef - it's a joy rather than a nightmare.


Mottram Hall

By Anthea Gerrie, March 12, 2015

You may not get to bend the ear of Beckham, but Mottram Hall is one of the few places you could find yourself rubbing shoulders with the stars of Manchester United and Manchester City.


Beefing up on an old favourite

By Anthea Gerrie, March 5, 2015

There can be precious few places where Jewish and Irish cuisines converge, but for both cultures, one dish is paramount. As St Patrick's Day approaches, the Irish are looking forward to a traditional festive treat Ashkenazi Jews enjoy year round - succulent salt beef, aromatic, prettily pink and unashamedly fatty.


Plaza Athenee

By Anthea Gerrie, March 5, 2015

Is the Plaza Athenee really the best hotel in Paris?


From Skegness to London with chrein

By Anthea Gerrie, February 19, 2015

Skegness may seem an unlikely place to forge a stellar cooking career, but it's where Ben Tish made the two most important culinary connections of his life. One was with star chef Jason Atherton, who happens to be a fellow townsman, the other with his grandmother, Ada Tish.


Old Swan and Minster Mill

By Anthea Gerrie, January 29, 2015

Expectations are always going to be high of a de Savary hotel, given the entrepreneur's reputation for making over old properties and infusing them with a touch of quirky class. This is as true of the Old Swan and Minster Mill as any of his previous hostelries, but this one comes with a few problems.


myhotel Bloomsbury

By Anthea Gerrie, January 8, 2015

It's easy to walk past myhotel Bloomsbury and not realise it's a newish, stylish but extremely reasonably-priced place to lay your head in the middle of the West End.


The view?I got it from Amazon

By Anthea Gerrie, November 13, 2014

Forget the Amazon. Just getting to our five-star eco-lodge on the riverbank was adventure enough.


Berry good news fromIsraeli pioneers

By Anthea Gerrie, October 7, 2014

British strawberries have long been the harbinger of our brief midsummer. Sadly, like summer itself, their season is short.


Old maps show Daniel the route to millions

By Anthea Gerrie, September 5, 2014

One of the earliest maps of London is being put on show in the capital this week by a Jewish expert.

The map, made in 1574, is one of the rarities collected by Daniel Crouch, who also owns the first map of the Americas, the world's first atlas printed in colour and the first map ever printed, dating back to 1475.


Kitchen failure: silver lining

By Anthea Gerrie, August 1, 2014

This time last year Roy Levy was weeping over the loaf he had just carefully lifted from his new oven. it was a lumpen mass: "i had been baking for 20 years, but this was nothing like the beautiful sourdough I was used to making," he laments.
"It was almost as if I had never learned to make bread."


Mixing it with the best

By Anthea Gerrie, July 31, 2014

He is a bar owner called Bar. And now he's set to make history as the first Israeli to take part in a prestigious coctail-making competition.

And Bar Shira, 35, has one disadvantage. He operates in a country with limited alcohol consumption.

"But bar life is only down 20 per cent while the country is at war," he said.

Mr Shira grew up in a household where alcohol was unknown.


Hotel de la Cite

By Anthea Gerrie, July 24, 2014

It may only be 108 years old, but the Hotel de la Cite is the last and most decorative piece in the 1,200-year-old jigsaw puzzle which makes Carcassonne such a fascinating place to visit.

It was at the beginning of the 9th century that this ancient citadel got its name when it survived a siege by Charlemagne with the help of its moat, drawbridge and thick Roman walls.


Best seats for summer sports fans

By Anthea Gerrie, July 18, 2014

For once, amazingly Wimbledon didn't open to rain this year and the fact that both the tennis and the World Cup coincided with a heatwave was a wake-up call to garden-owners who found themselves obliged to stay indoors to follow the action.


It's all coming back to me now

By Anthea Gerrie, July 18, 2014

It's back to the future this summer.


Athenaeum Hotel

By Anthea Gerrie, July 17, 2014

One irritation of a hotel stay is having to crawl out of bed to turn off the master switch by the door then stumble back in darkness - a hazard of increasingly sophisticated but unfathomable lighting systems.

If only I had clocked the "sleep" button which dims all the lights from a bedside console when I was shown to my room, my stay would have been pretty well perfect.

You certainly can't b


Tabor wine: it's the real thing

By Anthea Gerrie, July 10, 2014

It's a very modern Israeli fairytale. A grape grower - the fourth generation of growers in his village - decides not to sell his grapes to wine makers any more. Instead, he finds a wine-maker to help him produce his own wine. The results are so good that a subsidiary of multi-national Coca-Cola notices and invests millions.



By Anthea Gerrie, June 12, 2014

In a gloriously green, fresh-air city surrounded by water, it can be hard to find the serenity which is the secret weapon of the most beautiful capital in Scandinavia.

Enter the Skeppsholmen Hotel, which offers peace, quiet and high design just a 10-minute stroll from Stockholm's bustling city centre.


Hotel of the week: The Francis Hotel

By Anthea Gerrie, January 17, 2014

What you really want when you get to the Georgian architectural extravaganza that is Bath, is a hotel that really lets you live the dream. The Francis is one of just a handful in this elegant town which lives up to the promise, but has been rather delightfully reinterpreted with a touch of je ne sais quoi by the French.