No point playing the pain game

The beauty of Israeli sportsmen and women is that they always look on the bright side of life. They tell it how it is. After all, it's sport – not life or death.

In certain countries there would be a major fall-out for continued failure at Wimbledon. But not this year. Sela is about to make the big dip into marriage, while Peer is starting to think about life after tennis. "I'd like to do something with food," she told me in one of the interview rooms at Wimbledon. "I don't know what exactly. Not cooking, but maybe be the face of a restaurant."

Peer has been through the sporting doldrums over the past couple of years. Having reached the fourth round in 2008, it was good to see her fighting all the way. She is now looking at the bigger picture – realising what an honour it is to be an elite sportsperson.

The problem is that the Israelis don't play or train on grass courts all that often and if the draw is unkind, as it was this year, the chances are that they won't get very far. They are hamstrung.

● Speaking of tight limbs, I'd like to reflect briefly on the Maccabi GB Community Fun Run. I was delighted as much as I was relieved that my body held up and I completed the 10k, 5k and 1k - back-to-back, and in temperatures in excess of 26 degrees. I have to say my energy levels surpassed expectation.

The event was a resounding success and Maccabi GB deserve huge credit for bringing the community and 43 organisations together. I now know Copthall like the back of my hand and congratulate Saracens's Allianz Stadium for playing the role of host to perfection.

● It's a shame that Luis Suarez isn't Jewish, otherwise we could've splashed with a big backpage headline of 'Canine horror'.

    Last updated: 6:49pm, June 27 2014