Obituaries

Obituary: David Marcus

July 16, 2009

Born Cork, August 21, 1924. Died Dublin, May 9, 2009, aged 84.

As editor of the New Irish Writing pages of The Irish Press for 18 years, David Marcus was mentor to a generation of writers.

The grandson of Lithuanian immigrants, he came from a talented family, with three brothers and a sister surviving him. His uncle, Gerald Goldberg, was an eminent barrister and arts patron, his brother Louis became one of Ireland’s foremost documentary film makers. He himself was a talented pianist with a love of Mozart.

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Obituary: Hilda Howard

June 17, 2009

A true communal stalwart, Hilda Howard grew up in the small but vibrant Jewish outposts of Wales.

Born in Tsarist Russia in now independent Ukraine, she was brought to Britain as a baby with her older brother, Jack, when her parents, Max (Michal) and Chaya Kurshion, settled in Llanelli, then a thriving South Wales manufacturing centre of tin and steel.

Six months later Max died, aged 30. His 27-year-old widow went from door to door in the surrounding villages, selling drapery goods on tick. She came home every evening to clean and cook.

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Obituary: Mendi Rodan

June 17, 2009

One of Israel’s leading conductors and music advisers, Mendi Rodan was hounded after applying to leave Romania.

At 16 he was the first violinist of the National Symphonic Orchestra of Romania, and at 24 its principal conductor. This despite the fact that in 1941, when he was 12, his father and other relatives had been murdered in a pogrom in their home town of Yassi.

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Obituary: Dolly Phillips

June 17, 2009

Anglo-Jewry’s longest serving volunteer, Dolly Phillips became involved in the Manchester Jewish Soup Kitchen in 1920, aged 17, writes Yaakov Wise.

Born Dolly Franks, her voluntary service career spanned nearly 90 years. She retired in 2004, aged 101, but still made occasional visits to inspect conditions and instruct staff.

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Obituary: Nina Farhi

June 17, 2009

Pioneering psycho-analytic psychotherapist Nina Farhi did not start her career till her 40s, having lost her father when she was 19, writes Lawrence Joffe.

Growing up in modest circumstances, Nina Gould was one of four talented children of a civil servant, himself the son of Orthodox immigrants from Poland and Galicia.

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Obituary: Edith Hahn-Beer

May 7, 2009

The extraordinary tale of Edith Hahn-Beer only came to light in 1997 when, aged 83, she sold her collection of papers at auction to raise money for an eye operation.

Sotheby’s waived their ban on Nazi material because of this unique case of a Jewish woman saved by a Nazi.

One of three sisters, Edith Hahn was was encouraged by her widowed mother to study law but her final qualification was prevented by the 1938 Nazi takeover of Austria, the Anschluss.

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Obituary: John Chillag

May 7, 2009

Auschwitz survivor John Chillag co-founded Leeds Holocaust Survivors Friendship Association, writes John Fisher.

His family left Vienna after the 1934 Nazi attempt to overthrow Austria’s government. John’s father, Jozsef Csillag, joined the family business in Gyor, western Hungary, based on building materials and contracting.

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Obituary: Moss Kaye

May 7, 2009

A leading 1940s jazz player, Moss Kaye switched careers to become a well known north-west London estate agent.

One of eight children, he grew up in Fournier Street in London’s East End. His parents, Max and Bella Kauffman, born in Russia and Poland, came to Britain around 1907 and married in 1915. Max worked as a furrier on the ground floor of their home, which also provided a stiebl.

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Obituary: Ralph Cooperman

May 7, 2009

Champion fencer Ralph Cooperman was among the most talented of the small post-war group of young Jewish fencers who successfully competed in the 1950 Third Maccabiah, the first games held in Israel, and who went on to represent Great Britain in world championships and Olympic Games.

The group included Allan Jay, who won the 1959 World Foil Championship and two silver medals at Rome in 1960.

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Obituary: Edward Levine

April 29, 2009

Nationally renowned cancer expert Dr Edward Levine had a brilliant career both academically and as a caring and much-loved doctor to his patients.

Brought up with his two brothers in a traditionally Orthodox family in Hull, he was educated at Hymers College and read medicine at Pembroke College, Cambridge, and Westminster Medical School, qualifying in 1983.

After junior appointments at Westminster Hospital and the then London Hospital, Whitechapel, he settled in Prestwich after marrying Tanya Sterrie in 1988.

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