Swansea

Rabbi's window on a Swansea childhood

By Jay Grenby, May 27, 2010

As a six-year-old in 1956, Cockfosters and North Southgate Synagogue rabbi Yisroel Fine was pictured with his mother at the opening of a new shul for Swansea Hebrew Congregation. Now 54 years later, the Welsh shul's stained glass windows, so familiar from his childhood, have been installed in the Cockfosters building.

When the Swansea shul closed last year, Rabbi Fine was alerted to the concern of the community's few remaining members for the future of the windows - a set of nine illustrating the festivals and a further set of 12 for the tribes of Israel.

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Michael Howard pays to restore Swansea cemetary

By Robyn Rosen, December 17, 2009

Michael Howard has helped to pay for the restoration of a vandalised Jewish cemetery in Swansea, where his father was buried.

The United Synagogue’s burial team was asked to restore Townhill Cemetery, which is now closed, by Mr Howard and the local Jewish community.

Mr Howard, the former Conservative leader, offered to pay for some of the team’s expenses and asked for his father, who was buried there in 1966, to be moved to Bushey cemetery to join his late mother.

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Wales' oldest synagogue conversion plans approved

By Jessica Elgot, November 23, 2009

Planning permission has been granted for Wales' oldest synagogue to be converted into apartments.

The Grade II listed building, on Bryntirion Road, Merthyr Tydfil, was built in the 1870s. It is currently empty and has been a target for vandals.

Planning permission and Listed Buildings consent has been approved by Merthyr Tydfil County Borough Council.

The decision will now be referred to Cadw, the Welsh Heritage arm of the Welsh Assembly government.

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Wales' oldest synagogue to become apartments

By Jessica Elgot, November 18, 2009

Wales’s oldest synagogue is to be converted into apartments if planning permission is approved by councillors.

The Grade II listed building, on Bryntirion Road, Merthyr Tydfil, was built in the 1870s. It is currently empty and has been a target for vandals.

The neo-Gothic building has been used as a Christian community centre and a gym since the synagogue closed in 1983. It is thought to be the only synagogue with a Welsh dragon as part of its architecture.

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Closure of Swansea Hebrew synagogue

September 3, 2009

Guests travelled from as far afield as Canada and Israel for a reunion to mark the closure of Swansea Hebrew Congregation’s synagogue.

Organising committee member Jackie Factor was “delighted and amazed” by the 180 turnout.

With less than 20 active members, the community has sold its building to the Lifepoint church group. From November, it will rent a small hall in the premises to continue services.

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Swastika mystery in Aberystwyth

By Marcus Dysch, August 20, 2009

A series of alledged antisemitic attacks are being investigated by police in a Welsh seaside town where strictly Orthodox Jews were on holiday.

Officers in Aberystwyth responded to reports of swastikas painted on grass and sheets of paper daubed with the Nazi symbol being scattered near a student village where dozens of Chasidic Jews were staying.

But Dyfed-Powys police said they had found no evidence of the grass incident and had received no complaints from the Jewish visitors.

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Church wants to buy Welsh synagogue

By Clarissa Sebag-Montefiore, December 23, 2008

Swansea Hebrew Congregation is selling its 67-year-old synagogue building to a church group.

The community has less than a dozen-and-a-half active members with an average age of 70. Others have moved away but retain membership for burial or sentimental reasons.

If the sale to the LifePoint Church is completed, the congregation will be able to rent a small hall in the premises to continue services.

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