Violent teen accuses Jews of controlling government

A teenage milkman and his father, who called themselves the 'Aryan Strike Force', planned attacks on the government, because they believed it was controlled by Jews.


Nicky Davison

Nicky Davison

A teenager had been planning violent attacks on the government because he claimed it had been taken over by Jews, a court has heard.

Nicky Davison, a 19-year-old milkman, was accused at Newcastle Crown Court of being a co-founder, with his father Ian, of a group called Aryan Strike Force, an on-line far right extremist group which wanted to topple the government because they believed it was dominated by Zionists and Jews.

Ian Davison, 41, a disc jockey, has already admitted six charges, in June last year, including terrorism and producing a chemical weapon. He was discovered in possession of ricin, which can prove fatal if even an amount equivalent to less than half a grain of sand is inhaled or injected.

Andrew Edis, prosecuting, told the court that the website was set up to form a group that would be ready to act and fight what they called “ZOG”, which stood for Zionist Occupied Government.

Mr Edis said: “They are strongly against the government because their theory is that it has been taken over by the Jews and therefore must be resisted by white supremacists.”

Davison and his father were not simply “keyboard warriors” but were more interested in action.

The court was shown videos from the website which included pictures of the fall of the British Empire and footage from the September 11 Twin Towers attacks, which it claimed was one of the atrocities of Islam.

Another video showed neo-Nazis at a Wolf-Pack training camp in Cumbria, dressed in balaclavas, carrying Nazi flags and making Heil Hitler salutes.

Mr Edis said that Davison was not in the dock for his views, but because he wanted to go further and possessed a document that contained information that could prove useful to a terrorist.

When police raided Davison’s home, they found online copies of manuals including The Anarchist’s Cookbook and the Poor Man’s James Bond., which gave information about how to make letter bombs, explosives, detonators, grenades, silencers and poisons.

Davison, of Annfield Plain, Co Durham, denies two charges of possessing material containing information likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing acts of terrorism. The case continues.

    Last updated: 3:18pm, April 15 2010