Queen's birthday honours for Daniel Day Lewis, Matthew Gould and money mensch Martin Lewis

By Daniel Easterman and Naomi Firsht, June 13, 2014
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Academic award winning actor Daniel Day Lewis (Photo: Courtesy Jaguar)

Academic award winning actor Daniel Day Lewis (Photo: Courtesy Jaguar)

Jewish figures from the worlds of entertainment, diplomacy, the arts and philanthropy have been recognised in the Queen's birthday honours list.

Oscar-winning actor Daniel Day Lewis was honoured with a knighthood for services to drama.

Mr Day Lewis is Jewish on his mother's side, with maternal grandparents who were immigrants from Latvia and Poland.

Andras Schiff, the Hungarian-born classical pianist and conductor who is one of the most highly regarded interpreters of Bach, Mozart, and Beethoven in the world, also received a knighthood.

British ambassador to Israel Matthew Gould was honoured with the CMG in the Order of St Michael and St George which recognises diplomats and other Britons serving overseas. He was praised for his work in promoting trade, investment and technological co-operation between Israel and the UK.

Mr Gould said: "This award is a huge honour. It is a reflection of the wonderful progress that has been made in building the partnership between Britain and Israel in the last four years, and the importance that Britain attaches to that partnership.

"I am blessed with a fabulous team, committed partners, and an amazingly supportive wife. This award is more to their credit than to mine."

Britain's ambassador to Israel Matthew Gould (Photo: Mati Milstein)

Britain's ambassador to Israel Matthew Gould (Photo: Mati Milstein)

Fashion designer Zandra Rhodes was made a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire. Ms Rhodes is credited with bringing London to the forefront of the international fashion scene in the 1970s with her dramatic and bold designs.

Martin Lewis, a JC columnist and founder of the popular financial advice website, Money Saving Expert, was appointed an OBE for services to consumer rights and charitable services.

"Any type of honour like this is very humbling," said Mr Lewis. "I'm extremely proud. But it pales in comparison to the bigger cause of getting financial education on the national curriculum. This is something I truly believe in.

"There are not many times in this world when you can get a few letters after your name without having to study for it, so it's absolutely delightful to have this honour," he added.

Pensions and investments expert Dr Ros Altmann, who is also a columnist for the JC, became a CBE for her work in pension provision.

She said: "I am so delighted that the honours system has recognised me.

I hope that it will help others see that standing up for ordinary people and highlighting social injustice can be recognised.

"It was often really difficult to conduct pro bono campaigns on behalf of ordinary people but I do believe that my religious Jewish values have given me the strength and determination to help others. It is part of our heritage isn't it!"

Lady Morris of Kenwood, a consultant at the Manuel Swaden Solicitors practice, was made a CBE for services to the community.

Businessman Maurice Ostro became an OBE for services to charity and interfaith relations, recognising his role as vice-chairman of the Council of Christians and Jews.

Mark Pears, the chief executive of the William Pears Group property company and co-founder of the Pears Foundation, became a CBE for services to business and charity.

Barry Welck, 66, chairman and founder of the Langdon Foundation, was appointed an MBE for services to education and learning for disabled people.

He said: "We are totally delighted. I got involved in the charity because of my son, Daniel, who has learning disabilities."

Mr Welck founded the charity, Langdon in 1992, along with three other parents who have children with learning disabilities. Based in London and Manchester, the charity provides support for young Jewish adults with mild to moderate learning disabilities, enabling them to live independent lives.

"I had no idea it would turn into this. It's been a pleasure and a delight and this is the icing on the cake," he said.

Jonathan Shalit, 52, founder and chair of talent agency ROAR Global, became an OBE for services to the entertainment industry.

"Naturally I'm delighted and thrilled. There aren't many who get recognised in this way in my industry," he said.

ROAR represents some of the biggest names in music and broadcasting such as Charlotte Church, Myleene Klass, and the Britain's Got Talent winners.

Journalist and author David Landau was appointed an OBE for his services to advancing British-Israel understanding and peace in the Middle East.

Born in Britain, Mr Landau is a former editor-in-chief of the Israeli Haaretz newspaper, and is Israel correspondent for The Economist.

Last updated: 8:25pm, June 15 2014