Technology

How Israeli hi-tech works in the UK

By Jessica Elgot, March 10, 2011

If you watch Sky TV, own a mobile phone, go to a hospital, play video games or use internet banking, you are probably using Israeli technology, research or products.

The country is currently rated the third most productive hi-tech and innovation region in the world, second only to California and Massachusetts.

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IPhone becomes traffic spy camera

By Nathan Jeffay, March 10, 2011

Israel is notorious for bad driving. But transgressors should beware - big brother is watching.

New software transforms normal citizens' iPhones into monitoring and reporting devices for dangerous driving.

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Hollywood deal for Israeli film clip search start-up

By Jennifer Lipman, March 8, 2011

Film studio Universal has teamed up with an Israeli internet company to create the most comprehensive digital film archive yet.

AnyClip, founded in 2009 in Jerusalem, enables viewers to search for memorable scenes or key moments by entering keywords into a search engine.

Once a clip has been found, the scene can be watched online and posted on Facebook.

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Lord Sugar chosen as new YouView chairman

By Jennifer Lipman, March 7, 2011

Lord Sugar has been named as the new non-executive chairman of the catch up television service YouView.

YouView is a collaborative venture involving the BBC, Channel 4, TalkTalk and BT. Plans for the video on demand service were announced in December 2008. YouView is set to launch for customers next year.

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No toast in the JC this week

By Simon Round, March 4, 2011

Recently I acquired a smartphone. It was a confusing purchase because there were so many on offer. There was the iPhone 4, the Blackberry Torch, the HTC Desire and probably the LG Orgasm. In the end I went for the Samsung Galaxy S on the basis that Samsung are Chelsea's shirt sponsors.

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Anti-Israel 'vampire' hacks child play website

By Robyn Rosen, March 2, 2011

A group of websites run by a Sussex businessman have been hacked into by anti-Israel protesters.

Meynell Walter, the founder of the Meynell Games Group, which provides training and conferences to professionals who run children’s play groups, discovered seven of his websites had been hacked into last weekend.

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iPhone app helps remember the dead

By Jennifer Lipman, February 22, 2011

An Australian woman has developed an iPhone application to help mourners observe the Yahrzeits (anniversaries of the death) of their loved ones.

Gila Rakusin-Frankel came up with the idea for the iYahrzeit after she marked four years since the death of her brother Arie. Now available to download, the technology automatically reminds people of when an anniversary falls.

It also converts dates from the Hebrew calendar and comes with an English translation of the Mourner’s kaddish.

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Google plans Jerusalem street view

By Jennifer Lipman, February 21, 2011

Israelis could soon have the opportunity to spy on their neighbours and look around their cities from the comfort of their sofas, following Google’s announcement that it hopes to bring Street View to Israel.

Ministers will decide this week whether to give the internet giant the go-ahead and allow Google cameras to photograph the streets of Jerusalem, Tel Aviv and elsewhere in the country.

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Apple remove Nazi 'evil anthem' from iTunes

By Jennifer Lipman, January 27, 2011

Jewish organisations have applauded the decision by technology company Apple to remove a Nazi “anthem of evil” from sale in the ITunes store.

Until now Apple users could buy a version of the notorious marching anthem “Horst Wessel Lied” on the website.

The song, banned in Germany after the Holocaust, is dedicated to a Nazi supporter who died in 1930. It subsequently became a signature tune of the Nazi regime.

A spokesman for Apple Germany said the song was no longer on sale, however there are still concerns about the availability of other Nazi-related tracks on the site.

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Jewish studies goes online

January 20, 2011

The London School of Jewish Studies is joining forces with Rabbi Chaim Brovender's WebYeshiva.org to run interactive online courses.
In the virtual classroom, students can see, speak to or text their teacher and classmates. "We want to bring our ethos to a wider audience," said LSJS chief executive Dr Raphael Zarum. "Our goal is to offer courses that combine intellectual scholarship with modern relevancy to students beyond our physical campus."

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