Talmud

The man who wanted to destroy the Talmud

By Dr Harry Freedman, August 25, 2013

Many of us were amused, and perhaps a little flattered, to hear that the Archbishop of Canterbury had a Jewish father. But our ability to treat the archbishop’s ancestry in a light-hearted manner is a testament to the quality of contemporary interfaith relations.

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The book that can help you change your mind

By Rabbi Shulamit Ambalu, August 11, 2013

I think I’ve changed my brain. A year ago I read books, magazines, newspapers even the cereal pocket. I was lover of fiction, albeit with very little time for reading. A year ago, I, like tens of thousands of Jews around the world, started the Daf Yomi cycle — a seven-and-a-half-year commitment to learn a page of Talmud a day. Or more accurately, a folio, which has two sides.

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Talmud: a crossover text?

By Simon Rocker, July 26, 2013

A unique programme in London is trying to make the Talmud more accessible to readers outside the yeshivah world.

The Open Talmud Project attracted some 40 students over a four-day summer course held this week at UJIA headquarters and the Moishe House.

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The seductive appeal of the Talmud

July 7, 2013

I was first introduced to Talmud at around the age of 10 and by the time I was barmitzvah I was able to study it unaided, which I did assiduously during my teenage years.

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'Microgrants' make a big difference

By Jessica Elgot, July 21, 2011

Small is beautiful for Jeneration, which has spent £4,500-plus on grants assisting small innovative ventures.

It has disbursed between £50 and £400 "microgrants" to activities including "Cartoon Kippah" - a Jewish podcast run by David Yehudah Stern - a Talmud study group and youth movement Habonim's bike restoration project for refugees.

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Why the Talmud can’t be left to the yeshivah

By Rabbi Dr Norman Solomon, June 4, 2009

Never, in the history of British Jewry, has so much Talmud been studied by so many people with such enthusiasm. It is studied in the yeshivot, it is studied in the universities, it is studied on buses and trains. I once got in a lift in a hotel in Warsaw and by the time I reached the first floor, a brief glance revealed that the man standing next to me had his eyes glued on the daf yomi, the daily page (available online, with commentary) for those who read Talmud on a roughly seven-year cycle; a friendly greeting, and I picked up his Mancunian accent.

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