Second World War

Tour de France snubs velodrome Holocaust memorial

By Michel Zlotowski, July 12, 2012

The Amaury Sport Organisation (ASO), which runs the Tour de France, has said it is not the business of a sports organisation to commemorate the 1942 round-up of Paris’s Jews, despite the involvement of the cycling body’s former director in the mass-deportation.

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Gino Bartali: the Tour de France hero who defied Mussolini

By Simon Round, July 5, 2012

There are plenty of sporting heroes — people who have scored vital last-minute goals, run world records or taken a hatful of wickets. However, Italian cyclist Gino Bartali truly deserves the accolade.

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Hague to honour wartime British spy who saved Jews

By Marcus Dysch, June 15, 2012

Foreign Secretary William Hague is to unveil a plaque at a Jewish cemetery in honour of a British spy who saved thousands of Jews from the Nazis.

Major Frank Foley worked undercover for MI6, posing as a passport officer at the British Embassy in Berlin. He provided fake exit papers and acquired visas to help 10,000 German Jews escape.

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Refugees' hidden role to be revealed on stage

By Jennifer Lipman, May 31, 2012

The Jewish refugees who played a vital but hidden role in Britain’s Second World War intelligence efforts are to be celebrated in a new stage production.

As war raged across Europe, the British recruited German-speakers who had fled Nazi persecution and posted them as “listeners” in prisoner of war camps across the country.

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Bugged conversations 'could reveal extent of Britain's Holocaust knowledge'

By Martin Bright, May 31, 2012

The author of a forthcoming book on the Jewish refugees who listened in on the bugged conversations of captured German PoWs believes that the work of this top secret operation could reveal the extent of British government knowledge of the Holocaust during the war years.

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Lithuanian youth head backs Nazi leader

By Jane Whyatt, May 24, 2012

The head of Lithuania’s national youth association (ULNY) has denied that the country’s wartime puppet leader authorised the transportation of thousands of Jews to the Kaunas ghetto — and maintained that Jews cannot join his movement.

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The war hero in my family

By Stephen Adler, April 20, 2012

At 8.15am on April 12 1942, Sergeant Maxwell Addess and his observer, Sergeant B.A.T. Lane took off from North Coates airfield in Lincolnshire on a reconnaissance mission over the coast of Holland. 236 Squadron, to which Max belonged, was tasked primarily with shipping reconnaissance and escort duties. In some ways, this was just a routine mission.

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Dachau survivor's art show

By Jennifer Lipman, February 23, 2012

The artwork of one of the last surviving prisoners interned in Dachau has gone on display at the Austrian Cultural Forum in London.

Ernst Eisenmayer, who is 92, has worked as a sculptor and painter since the end of the Second World War.

Mr Eisenmayer, who was born in Vienna, was sent to prison at the age of 18 before the war began when the Nazis caught him trying to flee to Switzerland.

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Honour for Kinder from Innsbruck

February 16, 2012

Three women who fled the Nazis as children have been honoured by Innsbruck City Council more than 70 years later.

Vera Adams, Dorli Neale and Vera Graubart all came to Britain on the Kindertransport in 1938, which enabled around 10,000 children to escape Nazi Europe.

The trio were awarded the prestigious Innsbruck's Cross of the Order of Merit at a ceremony at the Austrian ambassador's resid

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Iran's Schindler, who saved the 'Aryan' Jews

By Meir Javedanfar, January 12, 2012

Abdol Hossein Sardari was not a household name for the Iranian Jewish community. Not until recently, that is. A newly published book, In the Lion's Shadow, reveals how he had helped thousands of Iranian Jews escape Nazi-occupied France during the Second World War.

At that time, Iran's ruler, Reza Shah, had economic and diplomatic relations with Nazi Germany.

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