Refugees

She's taken the aid bus to Calais

By Jay Grenby, February 11, 2016

The daughter of a Northwood and Pinner Liberal Synagogue leader has driven a bus to the Jungle refugee camp in Calais laden with food and other essential supplies purchased with NPLS members' donations.

Bristol-based Jess Wolvey was heartened by the response of congregants to an appeal for support in the synagogue newsletter. More than £750 was donated in less than a week.

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Refugee's story becomes school computer game

By Charlotte Oliver, February 4, 2016

A refugee whose family made a perilous journey across eastern Europe to escape the Nazis has seen her life transformed into an educational computer game.

Students from Glasgow Caledonian University have teamed up with Gathering the Voices, an organisation that collects the stories of survivors who settled in Scotland, to design the game, which is based on the life of Marion Camrass.

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Jewish group says David Cameron’s plan to take in refugee children ‘lacks boldness of Kinderstransport’

By Rosa Doherty, February 1, 2016

The Jewish Council for Racial Equality has complained that David Cameron’s proposal to take unaccompanied refugee children into the UK does not go far enough, calling it underwhelming and disappointing.

The UK is to accept more unaccompanied child refugees from Syria and other conflict zones, but the government has not said how many.

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A marvellous conversationalist who befriended them all

By Tom Gross, January 20, 2016

George Weidenfeld was still so intellectually sharp and insightful at the age of 96 that we all thought he’d live for ever.

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Learning the lessons of the Kindertransport

By Edie Friedman, December 8, 2015

The plight of unaccompanied children during the current refugee crisis resonates in two important ways. First, the focus on children strikes an emotional chord and second, we inevitably recall the Kindertransport, an important chapter in both Jewish and British refugee history.

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Fleeing Iraq was a dream come true, but then reality hit home

By Naomi Firsht, December 4, 2015

Edwin Shuker was born in Baghdad, Iraq, in 1955 and grew up in a small, close-knit Jewish community where everybody knew each other.

When the government started to place restrictions on Jewish life in the country, his family escaped - Mr Shuker was 16 when he, his parents, two younger sisters and grandmother arrived in Britain in 1971.

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We escaped from Hungary, but we paid a price

By Monica Porter, December 3, 2015

Suddenly the world is awash with refugees. And migrants. Great waves of humanity on the move, all seeking asylum. And as always, the movement is from east to west, because only traitors (think Kim Philby and Edward Snowdon) or religious fanatics (i.e. volunteers for jihad) ever flee in the opposite direction.

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Survivor who travelled to the UK by bomber

By Sandy Rashty, December 3, 2015

Born in 1927 to a traditional Jewish family in south-west Poland, Chaim "Harry" Olmer was one of 1,000 children who found refuge in Britain in 1946 - landing in a bomber, where he remembers sitting on the floor singing Hebrew songs with the other children.

Now after a career as a dentist, the 88-year-old grandfather of eight lives in Mill Hill, north-west London, with his wife Margaret.

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Refugee problem goes global as millions flee homelands

By Tim Marshall, November 26, 2015

map

Click on the map above to open up an interactive infographic of the full figures

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A century of search and rescue

By Liam Hoare, November 26, 2015

On February 11, 2015 - the day world leaders gathered in Minsk to hammer out a ceasefire deal for war-ravaged eastern Ukraine - more than 130 Jews were being safely transported out of the conflict zone to Dnepropetrovsk.

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