No entry to UK for extremist rabbi

By Jennifer Lipman, August 12, 2011

An extremist rabbi has been denied entry to Britain because of a book in which he allegedly justifies terrorist violence.

Rabbi Yosef Elitzur, from Israel, has been told he cannot enter the UK for three years because of his controversial 2009 book Law of the King. The rabbi said he had no plans to visit Britain when he received the letter.


Reduction time at Sale

August 11, 2011

Cash-strapped Sale and District Hebrew Congregation has appointed a part-time minister to replace full-time rabbi, Aaron Lipsey, who has moved to Newcastle.

The south Manchester synagogue, which has a declining membership of 70 families, has taken on Natan Fagleman, who will conduct Shabbat and Yomtov services and take on pastoral responsibilities.


A couple for Stanmore

August 11, 2011

Stanmore and Canons Park Synagogue has appointed Benji and Aviva Landau as its new assistant community rabbi and rebbetzin.

The couple have a background in youth and educational work.

Rabbi Landau also holds a business studies degree and his wife a degree in history.

His primary responsibility will be to support and develop activities for youth, students and young adults.


Rabbi urges a bolder approach

By Simon Rocker, August 11, 2011

One of Britain's most senior Orthodox ministers has called for bolder leadership, saying that too many rabbis are seen as "unworldly and uneducated".

Rabbi Dr Jeffrey Cohen's comments were made in a hard-hitting sermon at Hampstead Garden Suburb Synagogue on Shabbat.

The former Stanmore minister cited a talmudic story connecting the destruction of the Temple to the failure of rabbis in Roman


Chief Rabbi selection: how Israel does it

By Nathan Jeffay, August 11, 2011

The defining characteristic of the chief rabbi selection process in Israel is that involves secular as well as religious communities.

In a country polarised between secular and religious, this has allowed the rabbinate, which is state-maintained, to be regarded as a national and not just a sectarian institution.


In 209 years only two chief rabbis went to the vote

By Miri Freud-Kandel, August 11, 2011

Chief rabbinate elections have historically been characterised more by autocracy than democracy.


Time for Jew in the pew to ask searching questions

By Rabbi Yitzchak Schochet, August 11, 2011

When the election for president of the United Synagogue was under way, rumours were circulating that the contenders each had his own preferred candidate he would like to see "selected" as the next chief rabbi. The president would de facto become a member of the ambiguous group known as the Chief Rabbinate Trust and could then exert his influence to achieve his aims.


It's the 21st century - time to elect our leader

By TheJC.com, August 11, 2011

In 2013, a new chief rabbi will be appointed. He has a tough act to follow. Lord Sacks is not universally popular - who is? - but whatever disagreements he may have prompted within Anglo-Jewry by his various actions and inactions, he has become a towering figure within our nation. Almost alone among religious leaders, he commands respect across all beliefs and none.


How the other religions manage it

By Simon Rocker, August 11, 2011

The Chief Rabbi of the United Hebrew Congregations of the Commonwealth - to give the post its full title - has sometimes been seen as our equivalent to the Archbishop of Canterbury. Just as the archbishop heads the Church of England, the state's official church, so the chief rabbi leads UK's largest Jewish denomination.


Reform reject chance to choose Chief Rabbi

By Simon Rocker, August 11, 2011

The man heading the search for the next chief rabbi wants to give the non-Orthodox community a say in the appointment, in a bold gesture intended to secure communal consensus over the position.

Stephen Pack, the new president of the United Synagogue, says he would like to offer religious groups both to the right and left of central Orthodoxy a role in choosing Lord Sacks's successor.