Jewish identity

Gena Turgel

January 24, 2013

“I was in the gas chamber and I did not die. Something was wrong with the mechanism and we walked out. Because God saved my life I have a duty, a mission, to educate and to be observant. Some survivors ask ‘where was God?’ but who are we to ask?”

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Susi Bechhofer

January 24, 2013

“Because of the Shoah, in practical terms Judaism doesn’t mean an awful lot, which is very sad. But in terms of my identity, it is my life force. It has been a mountain to climb in terms of self-education and introspection but now it’s part of my being.”

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Zigi Shipper

January 24, 2013

“Being Jewish was the reason we were in Auschwitz. We were young, we asked: where is God? But now I ask, why do we get angry with God? It is humans that do these things. Being ‘the chosen people’ doesn’t mean anything to me. You are a human being first.”

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Mala Tribich

January 24, 2013

“It means family bonds, roots, an automatic affinity, a sense of belonging, the comfort of knowing that others think alike, that I am part of a community. The practice of religion for me is not about the letter of the law but the spirit of the law.”

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Chief Rabbi Lord Sacks

January 17, 2013

“Being Jewish means being a member of a people with a history like no other, being loyal to its past and responsible for its future, bringing the Shekhinah, the divine presence, into the world by the love and forgiveness we show, and being a voice of hope in the conversation of humankind.”

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Zvi Solomons

January 17, 2013

“Being Jewish means you meet someone you’ve never seen before, on the other side of the world — and they turn out to be family.”

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Baruch Levin

January 17, 2013

“Feeling a sense of connectedness with God which inspires a committed Jewish lifestyle and enables me to make a meaningful and uniquely Jewish contribution to society. I pray that those who open the capsule share this definition; a sure sign that Jewish continuity is alive and well.”

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Bentzi Sudak

January 17, 2013

“Belonging to a global family blessed with a rich, divine heritage. We are responsible to ensure our heritage remains vibrant and accessible to every Jewish man and woman, and to inspire, by example, all humankind towards wholesome faith and meaningful living, and a better world.”

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Naftali Brawer

January 17, 2013

“If I had to choose its most essential elements I would say it means having an intense and often complex relationship with God, an obsession with social justice, a passion for books, study and ideas and having the courage to go against the current.”

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Chaim Kanterovitz

January 17, 2013

“Responsibility and accountability set out by the word of Hashem in the holy Torah. A meaningful life filled with joy and happiness, one of ultimate pleasure basking in the shadow of the Shekhinah. Improving the world and knowing one’s place within the world and with God.”

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