Jewish Community Centre

Sparks ignites regional improvement schemes

August 13, 2009

Awards totalling £95,000 to advance Jewish life in the regions have been announced by Sparks — the Clore Jewish Development Fund — and the Jewish Community Centre for London.

Fourteen projects spanning education, regeneration, youth and outreach work have been backed with sums ranging from £2,000 to just under £10,000. The applications were considered by a panel including Baroness Neuberger and JCC chief executive Nick Viner.

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Jewish Community Centre attracts a capacity crowd to its "Sing Off"

October 30, 2008

The Jewish Community Centre attracted a capacity crowd to its "Sing Off". Hampstead Town Hall was packed with 200 people of all ages, who were treated to performances by the Zimmers and the Jewish Care choir. Participants were also offered various workshops. At the end of the day, a concert was held to celebrate all the choirs, which included a performance by Jonah and the Whalers, led by scriptwriter and TV producer Dan Patterson.

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JCC abandons plans for its new building

By Simon Rocker, July 24, 2008

Plans for the first American-style Jewish community centre in the heart of London have been shelved, a decision blamed by its backers on the worsening economic climate.

The board of the Jewish Community Centre for London (JCC) has announced it is putting on hold a scheme to develop an 80,000-square-foot former car showroom in Finchley Road, Swiss Cottage, bought just over a year-and-a-half ago.

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Rethink is the only sane solution, says Duffield

July 24, 2008

Dame Vivien Duffield, whose idea it was to build a JCC in London, was inspired by her visit to the Manhattan JCC in New York’s Upper West Side. She launched the idea at a power breakfast in October 2003, bringing on board some surprising people — such as Lord Brittan — who had not previously shown much interest in Jewish communal affairs, but were attracted by the idea of a JCC whose doors were open to all kinds of Jews, secular as well as religious.

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‘It was not ever viable’

July 24, 2008

The decision to shelve plans for the full redevelopment of the JCC’s site has led to fresh questions as to whether a new building is necessary at all.

Walter Goldsmith, vice-president of the Jewish Music Institute and chair of the Simcha on the Square festival, is among those who believe that the JCC should remain a “virtual” centre, organising events in different venues.

He said: “Their programming seems to be very good and well-supported. I don’t see why they need a building.”

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Analysis: The best-laid plans...

By Simon Rocker, July 24, 2008
The Jewish Community Centre for London is the first major Jewish project to be credit-crunched. Escalating building costs and the economic slide have been cited as the reasons for putting the ambitious building scheme on hold.

Andrew Franklin, the publisher who chairs the JCC board, said: "What is so extraordinary is the economy is deteriorating so fast in banking, property, finance, hedge funds - areas where many of the most generous of likely donors are involved."

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I'm sorry that I got my way

By Jonathan Freedland, July 24, 2008

Let's hope the JCC does not lose momentum now its building plans have been shelved


One of the oddities of my line of work is the frequent desire to be proved wrong. Often we commentators make dire predictions about the state of the world, issuing gloomy warnings about the consequences of this or that decision, consequences which - as citizens, rather than journalists - we obviously hope will never materialise. In this game, vindication is rarely sweet and often bitter.

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Quinn of The Spectator in new JCC role

May 8, 2008

In her first post since quitting as publisher of The Spectator magazine, Kimberly Solomon Quinn has begun work as the chief fundraiser for Dame Vivien Duffield’s brainchild, the Jewish Community Centre for London.

Mrs Quinn, who took the job of development director this week, attended the launch breakfast for the centre held by Dame Vivien in October 2003, which attracted many people not previously associated with the Anglo-Jewish community.