History

'Enemies' who fell in love with their adopted country

By Helen Fry, August 9, 2012

The issue of "enemy aliens" and identity raises some unique and often unexplored perspectives. At the outbreak of war in September 1939, the refugees who had fled Nazi Germany and Austria were classified as "enemy aliens" and, as such, had a number of restrictions imposed upon them by the British authorities.

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Reinventing ourselves, throughout the generations

By Trudy Gold, August 9, 2012

How to define Jewishness? When Manassah Ben Israel petitioned for the readmission of the Jews to England in 1655 he referred to the Jewish Nation. In debates on emancipation during the 19th century, the term was Jewish Race. After emancipation, most Jews regarded themselves as Jewish citizens of the countries in which they lived. In this country, every new wave of immigrants tried to anglicise.

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London Olympics: Bombay boxers and Hebrew basketball players

By Jennifer Lipman, August 2, 2012

Next to the JC's report of French Jewish athlete Micheline Ostermeyer's successes in the 1948 Games, there was a "missing relatives" column. The missing aunts, husbands, friends, came from Warsaw and Riga, Odessa and Lvov. "Last heard from in 1932," read one.

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Jerusalem's Yemin Moshe windmill to work again

By Jamie Michaels, July 26, 2012

Jerusalem's historic windmill is to be fully restored to its former working condition and launched at the end of August, 119 years after it stopped operating.

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How IOC scotched Israel before 1948 London Olympics

By Jennifer Lipman, July 26, 2012

Since the last time the Olympic Games were staged in London, Israeli athletes have won seven medals.

This week, the team will not only be looking to improve on this record, they will also be savouring the first chance to compete at a London Games under a blue and white flag.

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How Elizabethan society responded to Jews and prejudice

By Simon Rocker, July 12, 2012

Shakespeare’s Shylock is probably the most famous of all Jewish characters, but we are less familiar with how Jews lived when The Merchant of Venice was written in the 1590s.

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Medieval burial site discovered under garden

By Simon Rocker, July 5, 2012

A memorial stone was dedicated this week to mark the place of one of the oldest Jewish cemeteries in Britain.

The nearly 800-year-old burial site has lain beneath the Rose Garden in Oxford, just outside the city's Botanic Gardens, unknown to most people. Although a plaque was erected in 1931, it was on a wall that became covered in ivy, obscuring it from view.

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Building a bridge back to the Bible

By Jessica Elgot, July 5, 2012

Professor Yona Sabar is one of the last Jews on the planet who could have a conversation with Jesus, in his mother tongue.

When Professor Sabar arrived in Israel from northern Iraq in 1951, he imagined the language he grew up speaking was Kurdish - until a Hebrew University academic identified it as Aramaic.

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Building a bridge back to the Bible

By Jessica Elgot, July 5, 2012

Professor Yona Sabar is one of the last Jews on the planet who could have a conversation with Jesus, in his mother tongue.

When Professor Sabar arrived in Israel from northern Iraq in 1951, he imagined the language he grew up speaking was Kurdish - until a Hebrew University academic identified it as Aramaic.

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My grandmother the 'Shabbos goy'

By Martin Bright, July 5, 2012

I wasn’t entirely surprised to read about the almost utopian vision of East End life in Arnold Circus.

My grandmother, Irene Bevan, grew up in Bethnal Green and lived not far from the street mentioned in the BBC programme.

A mongrel East End gentile of uncertain origins herself, she always talked of the warmth between the Jewish and non-Jewish communities.

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