When history is in a sorry state

By Geoffrey Alderman, July 8, 2013

On June 25, Dr James Renton, a history lecturer, delivered a lecture at the School of Oriental and African Studies on the subject of the Balfour Declaration. Hosted by Jews for Justice for Palestinians, Renton addressed the question "Should Britain apologise for the Balfour Declaration?" He clearly believes the answer is in the affirmative.


An American thinker’s Jewish journey

By Kenneth Sacks, July 5, 2013

At a time when European antisemitism appears once again to be on the rise, it is pertinent to recall the experience of the 19th-century intellectual, Ralph Waldo Emerson, who learned of the struggles of British Jews and consequently became their advocate in America.


Banker, Traitor, Scapegoat, Spy?

By Geoffrey Alderman, July 5, 2013

Next year we shall commemorate the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War. When Britain declared war on Germany scenes of jubilation were seen throughout the UK. But as the war dragged on, and as British casualty lists climbed to obscene levels, violent anti-German hysteria, cynically exploited by politicians, gripped the nation.


Zionist history's murder mystery

By Colin Shindler, June 16, 2013

Eighty years ago this coming Sunday, Haim Arlosoroff was gunned down during a Friday-night walk with his wife on the Tel Aviv beach. He was 34 and a rising star in the Zionist firmament. He was a respected political thinker - in the words of his biographer, Shlomo Avineri: "the critical student of Marx, Kropotkin and Nietzsche, a product of Russian populism and German Romanticism".


New app reveals secrets of London’s diamond geezers

By Jennifer Lipman, June 13, 2013

New light is being shed on the London’s diamond trade, and the role played in it by Orthodox Jews.

Following the publication last year of Diamond Street — the Secret History of Hatton Garden, author Rachel Lichtenstein has now devised an app that uses film, photographs and text to take people on a virtual tour of London’s historic jewellery area.


How do we want our views to be remembered in 100 years?

By Jennifer Lipman, June 7, 2013

They "assert these things with a violence bordering on mental aberration," complained one aggrieved gentleman in a letter to this newspaper a century ago. "Things are implied, all of which are the last word in absurdity to the really Jewish imagination."


How Jamaican Jews and teenage photographers marked the Queen's coronation

By Jennifer Lipman, June 3, 2013

The ambassador of the fledgling state of Israel and Jewish dignitaries from Canada, Australia, Rhodesia and even Jamaica were at Westminster Abbey 60 years ago this week to watch Princess Elizabeth be crowned queen.


How Jewish suffragettes helped force a radical shift in British politics

By Jennifer Lipman, May 31, 2013

When Emily Davison was trampled to death by the king’s horse at Epsom on June 4 1913, the JC recorded the death of a “militant suffragette”.

A century later, Davison remains perhaps the most famous figure in the fight for women’s votes. But across Britain, Jewish women and men were playing a crucial role in the movement.


Two men in Nazi uniform ejected from Lancashire heritage event

By Jonathan Kalmus, May 30, 2013

Two men wearing Nazi uniform were ejected from a wartime-themed bank holiday event after organisers pledged to crack down on displays of Nazi regalia.

East Lancashire Railway (ELR) had barred enthusiasts attending its annual 1940s family fun day from wearing Germany military costume after complaints from Holocaust survivors and MPs.


World’s oldest Torah found - in a library

By Sandy Rashty and Anna Sheinman, May 29, 2013

An Italian university has found the world’s oldest complete Sefer Torah — in its library.

The sheepskin manuscript (below), which could be over 800 years old, has been held in the library of the University of Bologna for over 100 years.

It had previously been examined by an academic at the university in 1889, who mistakenly labelled it as a 17th century text.