Health

Is soya the food it’s cracked up to be?

By Joan Wides, January 21, 2010

The value of increasing soya in Western diets has been much debated. Is it healthy or harmful? It has its detractors, but this is a healthy food with some interesting qualities.

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'Sorry' for victims of Thalidomide

By Marcus Dysch, January 21, 2010

Two Jewish Thalidomide victims visited Parliament last week to witness the government’s long-awaited apology to those who suffered the consequences of the drug’s use 50 years ago.

Guy Tweedy and Nick Dobrick heard Health Minister Mike O’Brien express “sincere regret and deep sympathy” and confirm a £20 million package, worth around £40,000 each for more than 460 survivors and their families.

Mr O’Brien told the House of Commons the money, to be distributed by the Thalidomide Trust, would be used to meet the health needs of survivors.

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Reasons to be cheerful about SAD

By Anthea Gerrie, January 14, 2010

For his November trip to London, Dr Norman Rosenthal has packed a very important piece of bedside equipment with his shaving kit and toothbrush. It is the size of a paperback, but it is not a book or even an alarm clock — it’s a portable lightbox.

“I don’t go anywhere without it,” says the man who learned the hard way that he needed a daily turbo-infusion of wattage to get him through the winter. For Rosenthal is the man who discovered that diminishing daylight brings on SAD — the seasonal affective disorder which translates to one in five of us as winter blues.

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Swimming without that sinking feeling

By Lianne Kolirin, January 7, 2010

Instead of focusing on resolutions for 2010, I am basking in the glory of a last year’s achievement.

In 2009 I learned to swim front crawl — a big deal for someone who consistently thrashed around in the shallow end during school swimming lessons.

Rebecca Adlington I am not, but at 37 this old(ish) dog has just learnt a pretty nifty new trick. And I am happier and fitter for it.

I owe my achievement to Steven Shaw, a 47-year-old Londoner who has been described as the “horse whisperer of swimming”.

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Thalidomide campaigners win payout

By Marcus Dysch, December 30, 2009

Two Jewish thalidomide victims have welcomed the success of their long-running campaign which will see the government pay sufferers £20 million in compensation.

Guy Tweedy and Nick Dobrick, who were both born with shortened upper limbs as a result of being given the drug, had called for greater recognition for sufferers for the past seven years.

The Department of Health has now agreed to spread payment to the Thalidomide Trust over three years. The charity will share the money among Britain’s 463 surviving thalidomide victims.

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Top surgeon tells Limmud of campaign to have him struck off

By Leon Symons, December 30, 2009

One of Britain’s leading cancer surgeons has told a conference how his support for the Israel Medical Association sparked a campaign to have him struck off by the General Medical Council (GMC).

Professor Michael Baum told a packed session at the annual Limmud conference at Warwick University that colleagues — including Jews — in the medical profession had turned on him after he challenged the accusation made by some that the Israel Medical Association (IMA) was complicit in the torture of Palestinian prisoners.

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Thalidomide victims win cash payout

By Marcus Dysch, December 23, 2009

Two Jewish Thalidomide victims have welcomed the success of a long-running campaign which will see the government paying sufferers £20 million in compensation.

Guy Tweedy and Nick Dobrick had called for greater recognition for sufferers for seven years.

The Department of Health has now agreed to spread the payment to the Thalidomide Trust over a three-year period. The charity will share the money between Britain’s 463 surviving Thalidomide victims.

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Irish girl gets vital surgery in Israel

By Ruth Eglash, December 23, 2009

The prognosis was grim last year for Rachel Casey, an Irish two-year-old with Downs Syndrome who was born with hundreds of holes in her heart. Her local physician had not managed to operate successfully, and her options were running out.

“She had been very sick,” recalled her father, Gerry, 40.

“Her heart was described as being like ‘Swiss Cheese’, and her doctor said that if she was not operated on quickly, the chance to close the holes would pass.”

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Health insurance firm owes families hundreds

By James Martin, December 17, 2009

Policy-holders owed hundreds of pounds in claims have not received payouts on their medical cash plans since January.

Simplyhealth, which has taken over the HSA medical insurance group, promised “to settle on valid claims as quickly as possible” in August after admitting that customers had been given “limited information” about the status of their claims since the HSA began its claims investigations in January.

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Fruit diet cured my husband of cancer

By Anthea Gerrie, December 10, 2009

It was a legacy she never expected to put to the test. But when her husband was diagnosed with prostate cancer, Paula Davis felt instinctively that her grandfather’s dietary cure was the best bet for his survival.

“Conventional treatments can have unpleasant side effects like impotence and incontinence; it was Brian’s body, and he felt a treatment aiming to rid the body of disease through diet was a saner approach,” says the granddaughter of Dr Max Gerson.

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