Egypt

The Muslim Brotherhood is unlikely to win out

By Nathalie Tocci, March 10, 2011

The revolts sweeping the Middle East have shaken long-held truths about the region. True, Middle Eastern regimes had been remarkably resilient, remoulding their neo-authoritarian practices to the prerogatives of a globalised world. True also, despite its liberal rhetoric, the West sustained these regimes, viewing them as the lesser evil in a region supposedly plagued by religious extremism.

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Meet the new neighbours (and say a little prayer)

By Anshel Pfeffer, March 10, 2011

Egypt's appointment of a foreign minister known for his hostile views is causing ripples of concern across the Israeli political establishment.

On Monday caretaker Prime Minister Issam Sharraf appointed Nabil Al-Arabi as Egyptian foreign minister, in place of Ahmed Aboul Gheit.

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Foreign Office minister in Egypt to talk Israel, democracy

By Jennifer Lipman, March 9, 2011

The British foreign office minister for the Middle East is to discuss the direction of the Israeli-Palestinian peace process with the new generation of Egyptian political leaders.

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The peace will hold, says Anwar Sadat's widow

By Brigit Grant, March 3, 2011

It is the photograph that means more to Anwar Sadat's widow than any other. A family portrait taken on the eve of the former Egyptian president's departure to Israel to address the Knesset on November 19 1977. A landmark moment for the Middle East, and for his wife who was convinced she would never see him again.

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Egyptian troops back in Sinai, three decades on

By Nathan Jeffay, February 24, 2011

The unrest and subsequent ousting of President Hosni Mubarak in Egypt is already proving a game-changer in terms of the Egypt-Israel peace agreement.

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As Egypt convulses, Iran slips through Suez

By Anshel Pfeffer, February 24, 2011

Iran tried this week to divert attention from the growing unrest within its cities by sending two warships through the Suez Canal for the first time in over three decades.

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On this day: The United Arab Republic

By Jennifer Lipman, February 22, 2011

The pan-Arab dream, which saw old rivals Egypt and Syria join forces, only lasted three years. It collapsed in 1961 when Syria abandoned it, although Egypt retained the title for another decade.

The United Arab Republic (UAR) partnership came about for many reasons, not least to limit the influence of communist-leaning politicians in Syria.

With support from North Yemen and elsewhere, for a time it appeared the union could be the start of a new Middle East.

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Word on the street is… mild

By David Aaronovitch, February 21, 2011

In 2003, a matter of weeks after the fall of Saddam, I went to Cairo to make a programme for Channel 4.

I was apprehensive, not because I was asking about the problem of Middle Eastern antisemitism but because the airwaves and foreign pages had been full of hoary lock-shaking concerning what was universally called "The Arab Street".

TAS (for short) was furious. TAS was potentially violent towards Westerners. It would be best - when encountering TAS - to pretend to be Irish or Patagonian.

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Not a revolution, but a military coup

By Tim Marshall, February 17, 2011

Optimists peered through the Cairo dawn of February 12 and heralded a people's revolution ushering in a new era of freedom and democracy.

Less enthusiastic observers, looking through the exhaust smoke of the reversing tanks, saw a coup backed by a regime which will spend the year shoring up its power even as it prepares the country for free elections.

Egypt cannot go back to how things were, but this was no revolution. People power delivered the military what it wanted - the chance to get rid of Mubarak and ensure his son Gamal could not accede to the throne.

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West should be clear on goals

By Emanuele Ottolenghi, February 17, 2011

It is too early to tell whether Egypt and Tunisia will be the harbinger of an Arab spring of democracy. Both could go the way of Eastern Europe in 1989. But they could also be a rehash of Russia in 1917, Egypt in 1952, Iraq in 1958, or Iran in 1979, when the ousting of a hated rulerin favour of a new regime was exploited by dark forces.

But as Egypt goes, so does the Arab world. Jordan, Yemen, and Bahrain are now convulsed by popular unrest; Algeria, Morocco, and Saudi Arabia could be next.

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