Education

Balls praises JCoSS ethos

By Marcus Dysch, April 23, 2009

Schools Secretary Ed Balls said this week that the cross-communal JCoSS secondary school in Barnet will be a beacon for tackling discrimination and prejudice.

“This is a very important and significant day,” Mr Balls told the 200 guests at Monday’s ground-breaking ceremony for the £50 million project.

“This is a time when we have to redouble our efforts, say discrimination is wrong and stand together, community by community, to root out intolerance and prejudice. That is what this school is about.

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Lev Leviev's lost billions hits Soviet schools

By Anshel Pfeffer, April 22, 2009

A major downturn in the financial fortunes of Russian billionaire Lev Leviev has hit the network of Jewish schools he founded in the former Soviet Union. Last week, Mr Leviev’s Africa-Israel holding company announced a 2008 loss of 4.9 billion shekels, attributed mainly to the slump in property prices worldwide. Israeli business journalists estimate Mr Leviev’s personal losses since the financial crisis began at $1.7 billion.

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Barnet school forced to close

By James Martin, April 7, 2009

A strictly Orthodox Golders Green school will have to close after Barnet Council rejected a final retrospective appeal for planning permission last Wednesday.

Beis Medrash Elyon, educating 45 boys in Golders Green Road, has operated without planning permission for five years.

Councillor Dean Cohen proposed that the school be granted consent “on the grounds that it has been in place for some time and its current use has demonstrated significant benefit to the local community”. Councillors Eva Greenspan, Melvin Cohen and Jack Cohen highlighted its educational merits.

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Brits expand Hong Kong’s Carmel school

By Jenni Frazer, April 7, 2009

It might not be the first place that springs to mind when you think of Jewish education. But 460 Shau Kei Wan Road is a pivotal address for pupils at Hong Kong’s only Jewish school, Carmel School.

Two hundred and sixty children, aged up to 14, currently attend Carmel, four of whose hard-working executive board are British ex-pats. Now, steered by its newly-appointed British head teacher, Rachel Friedmann, formerly deputy head of Hasmonean in London, Carmel, founded in 1991, has big plans for expansion.

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Kingston’s Holocaust study days

By Jay Grenby, April 2, 2009

Over 500 pupils from five south-west London schools have taken part in Holocaust workshops postponed from their original dates in early February because of the heavy snowfalls.

The programme — related to Holocaust Memorial Day and now in its third year — is a joint venture of the Kingston United and Liberal congregations. Expanded due to demand, it is now supported by neighbourhood grants from the local authority.

Pupils aged 13-15 were addressed by Holocaust survivors who discussed their experiences and the importance of the young generation rejecting all forms of prejudice.

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Students told: Lead Now and reap rewards

By Ben Jaglom, April 2, 2009

A UJIA programme offering graduates the opportunity to combine a year of leadership work with classes in topics such as networking and conflict resolution was launched before an audience of communal and corporate representatives at BDO Stoy Hayward’s West End offices. The Lead Now scheme will also give participants the prospect of an internship in a major firm at the end of their year.

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Manchester schools star in league tables

By Jonathan Kalmus, April 2, 2009

Manchester’s three largest Jewish primaries are among the country’s top performing schools, according to the latest league tables based largely on year-six SATs exams.

At North Cheshire Jewish Primary, ranked 14th out of 14,000 schools, headteacher Jackie Savage said the close-knit Manchester community was key to local schools’ achievements as it brought a high level of educational co-operation.

There has been enormous improvement in the performance of junior pupils at Manchester King David Junior pupils, ranked 34th.

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King Solomon faces shortfall in pupils

By Leon Symons, March 26, 2009

King Solomon High School in Redbridge has not filled its 150 places after the first round of admissions.

But chair of governors Diana Lazarus remains confident that all places will be taken by the time the school year starts in September.

“We are suffering but we are bearing the repercussions of the opening of Yavneh [in Borehamwood] because pupils who would have come to us from north-west London are now going to their local school.”

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Governors resign in school dispute

By Simon Rocker, March 26, 2009

The chairman and four other governors of Rosh Pinah Jewish Primary in Edgware have resigned in a dispute with the school’s foundation body.

Roy Freedman, chairman of the 420-pupil school for the past three years, quit after a governors’ meeting on Tuesday, along with joint vice-chairman Melanie Laban and Howard Berg, Philip Ellis and Adrian Dayne.

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King David criticised by Ombudsman

By Cathy Forman, March 19, 2009

Liverpool’s King David Primary has been criticised by a Local Government Ombudsman for inadequately responding to a critical report on an admissions appeal complaint.

The Ombudsman, Anne Seex, reported in January 2008 that one of the school’s admission criteria was not “objective and clear”. It could not fully explain how it selected the 21 applicants from the 54 who applied under the same category as the complainant. The non-Jewish parent had not been given the reasons for his daughter being refused a King David place in 2006, so was unable to prepare for a second appeal.

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