Disability

Interview: Adam Feinstein

By John Nathan, September 21, 2010

It was on an aeroplane that Adam Feinstein first heard that his son Johnny, the youngest of his three children, was autistic. In the way that it is often easier to open up to someone you have never met and will probably never see again, Feinstein found himself telling the man next to him about something that was giving him great cause for concern.

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Delamere moves to new home

By Jonathan Kalmus, September 17, 2010

The Delamere Forest special needs school opened its new north Manchester operation this week.

On Sunday, 11 Delamere pupils from London moved into refurbished Crumpsall residential facilities. The following day, its 17 pupils began lessons at the newly built premises in Salford.

The project involved vacating Delamere's premises in Cheshire and creating three new classrooms and kosher catering facilities on the campus of Inscape House School in Walkden.

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Ray Rivlin is inspired by her disabled son to come up with a more inclusive Haggadah

By Candice Krieger, September 16, 2010

Dublin's Ray Rivlin has created her own simplified version of the Haggadah.

Inspired by her son Alan, who is a resident of the Leeds Rainbow Project, Mrs Rivlin decided to modify the Haggadah to make it more accessible to people with learning difficulties.

She tells People: "During Pesach last year I took the second Seder for the residents and simplified it for them. They seemed to like it and it struck me that it would be a good idea to write it down."

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Charity fears over special needs resources

By Jessica Elgot, August 26, 2010

The chief executive of special needs charity Kisharon has voiced concern that many of the growing number of severely disabled children in the Jewish community are not receiving specialised help early enough.

Beverly Jacobson said that with advances in modern medicine, "a premature baby or a child with a complex brain injury has a much higher chance of surviving, which is brilliant. But we need more resources for children with special needs."

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Shul that’s a model to them all

By Robyn Rosen, August 12, 2010

Cheshire Reform Congregation, also known as Menorah Synagogue, was previously housed in a 1960s flat-roofed, prefabricated building which was designed to have a 30-year life.

In 2004 work began on fund raising and designing a new building. Construction began in the summer of 2007 and the new building had its first service on Kol Nidre at the beginning of October 2008.

The new building, also single storey, was constructed to meet all the relevant requirements of the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 and Document M of the building regulations.

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Struggle over disability access at synagogue

By Robyn Rosen, August 12, 2010

Batya Wiles wants to go to shul. But unlike her Stamford Hill friends and family, hers is not a routine decision but an intense dilemma.

Ms Wiles has been in a wheelchair since 1986 and accessing synagogues which lack facilities for the disabled can be an intimidating and undignified affair.

During a recent visit to St John's Wood Synagogue, she says, "I wheeled through to the centre of the men's section where there was what looked like a wooden pen with no curtain. I was so embarrassed I wanted to leave, but I couldn't get out."

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New York schools shun special needs kids

By Paul Berger, August 5, 2010

Manhattan offers the Jewish parent everything: gleaming community centres, world-class Jewish day schools, and a synagogue on just about every corner. But when it comes to raising children with special needs, New York's glitziest borough is, apparently, lacking.

One recent Monday evening, about 150 people crowded into the basement of Congregation Shearith Israel, on Central Park West, to discuss "The Jewish Community's Obligation to Special Needs Children."

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New York schools shun special needs kids

By Paul Berger, August 5, 2010

Manhattan offers the Jewish parent everything: gleaming community centres, world-class Jewish day schools, and a synagogue on just about every corner. But when it comes to raising children with special needs, New York's glitziest borough is, apparently, lacking.

One recent Monday evening, about 150 people crowded into the basement of Congregation Shearith Israel, on Central Park West, to discuss "The Jewish Community's Obligation to Special Needs Children."

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Do the disabled get a raw deal in the Torah?

By Joseph Mintz, October 22, 2009

When I was 18, some 20 years ago, I worked for a summer doing Camp America in the Catskill Mountains of New York State. But this was a camp with a difference: it was run by an Orthodox Jewish organisation which catered for children with physical disabilities and learning difficulties (or “mental retardation” as it was referred to at the time).

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Alex Cowan jumps from 13,500ft to help fight multiple sclerosis

By Candice Krieger, May 30, 2008

She may struggle to walk, but that has not stopped West Londoner Alex Cowan from wanting to jump out of an aircraft. Ms Cowan suffers from the neurological condition multiple sclerosis (MS) and uses a wheelchair. On July 13, she plans to jump out of a plane flying at 13,500 ft, fall for 40 seconds, reach about 120 mph, and then float to the ground with the aid of a parachute.

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