Christianity

Interfaith relations strengthened in Scotland

October 14, 2010

The Scottish Council of Jewish Communities joined forces with the Roman Catholic Church in Scotland to celebrate the 45th anniversary of Nostra Aetate, the Vatican II declaration, which opened the way for dialogue between Christians and Jews.

The anniversary was marked by a series of events featuring Rabbi David Rosen and Father John Pawlikowski, both former presidents of the International Council of Christians and Jews. Rabbi Rosen is also a former Chief Rabbi of Ireland and Israel.

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Church leader links Israel to apartheid

By Leon Symons, October 7, 2010

The head of the Anglican Church in Wales has received a barrage of criticism after comparing the situation between Israel and the Palestinians to apartheid in South Africa.

Dr Barry Morgan, the Archbishop of Wales, was accused of damaging interfaith relations after an address to the governing body of the Church in Wales last week in which he described the situation in "Israel-Palestine" as appalling.

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Peer praises Chief Rabbi for 'beautiful' Pope reception

By Simon Rocker, September 21, 2010

Lord Patten, the co-ordinator of the Pope's visit, said that one of its most moving moments were the Chief Rabbi's words at Friday's interfaith meeting.

Lord Patten, assessing the visit, singled out the "the most beautifully expressed statement about the relationship between faiths" made by Lord Sacks.

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A new chapter in interfaith?

By Ed Kessler, September 21, 2010

The Chief Rabbi, Lord Sacks, proclaimed a "friendship across faiths" as he introduced Pope Benedict XVI to a select group of 100 representatives of Britain's religious communities in London.

It was the Vatican's Nostra Aetate declaration of 1965 that "brought about the single greatest transformation in interfaith relations in recent history," the Chief Rabbi said, "and we recognise your visit today as a new chapter in that story and a vital one".

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Comment: Why should I pay for the Pope?

By Peter Tatchell, September 7, 2010

I was born in 1952, seven years after the end of the Second World War.

My awareness of the Holocaust is one of the factors that spurred me to work for human rights, to ensure that such monstrous crimes never happen again.

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Chief Rabbi set to represent all faith communities

By Simon Rocker, September 2, 2010

The Chief Rabbi, Lord Sacks, has been asked to give the response at the Pope's main interfaith meeting during his state visit to Britain in two weeks' time.

Pope Benedict will address leaders of the country's faiths at St Mary's University College, Twickenham, a Catholic teacher training institution that is part of Surrey University.

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Can Pope Benedict soothe pain over Pius beatification?

By Simon Rocker, September 2, 2010

The proposed beatification of controversial wartime Pope Pius XII has shadowed Catholic-Jewish relations for more than 40 years.

Critics of Pius, who died in 1958, accuse him of having failed to use his influence to speak out on behalf of Europe's Jews as the Nazis closed in.

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Analysis: It's been a bumpy road, but this Pope wants to be our ally

By Ed Kessler, September 2, 2010

Pope Benedict XVI started his papacy in 2005, expressing a desire to follow in the footsteps of John Paul II, for whom reconciliation with Jews and Judaism was a high priority. Since then, Catholic-Jewish relations have not received as much Vatican attention although they continue to face significant challenges.

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Christian festival styles itself as the Gaza Strip

August 26, 2010

Thousands of music fans are expected to attend a four-day festival organised by Christian groups promoting Palestinian causes.

Greenbelt, held at Cheltenham Racecourse from today, will feature performances by Shed Seven and Beverley Knight and a promotional campaign entitled "If Greenbelt was Gaza." The campaign asks fans to "confront the stark contrast" between the event and the "day-to-day life experienced by Palestinians in the Gaza Strip" by asking them to consider how they would manage with only one tap on the site or how 12,800 festival-goers would survive without food.

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Lecturer's sacking 'not because of conversion'

By Jennifer Lipman, August 20, 2010

An Israeli lecturer in modern Hebrew who claimed she was made redundant because of her conversion from Judaism to Christianity has had her case of religious discrimination dismissed.

At an employment tribunal in Reading, Judge Lewis upheld Dr Tali Argov's complaint of unfair dismissal, but ruled that the academic was not entitled to any compensation.

Dr Argov had been working at the Oxford Centre for Jewish and Hebrew Studies for eight years when she converted to Anglicanism in January 2008.

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