FA Cup seller lists his museum goals

Max Dunbar

Max Dunbar

The man who sold the oldest FA Cup trophy for £420,000 starts work on Monday as the Manchester Jewish Museum CEO.

In a short but colourful career, Max Dunbar, 32, has been a photographic curator for the National Portrait Gallery, ran the World Rugby Museum at Twickenham and administered an Everton Football Club memorabilia collection. And at London auctioneer Christie's, he handled the sale of the 1871 silver FA Cup - the world's most expensive piece of sports memorabilia when sold in 2005.

Now the non-Jew is turning his attention to the cash-strapped museum in Cheetham Hill.

"It's difficult for all museums in the heritiage sector but it's a challenge I'm looking forward to embracing," he said.

"Drawing on my sports experience, sport appeals to many people and new audiences and is certainly one way we could possibly attract new audiences to the Jewish Museum."

It might partner with the National Football Museum opening in Manchester later this year. "Sports will be big with London 2012 and could certainly come into play for the Jewish community's history.

"My interest has always been the social history of sports, or anything else. The same applies to the impact the Jewish community has had in Manchester and the role it plays in Manchester life. The content of the Jewish Museum's collections are of huge interest. It's about bringing it into the 21st century."

His plans include expanding the museum's website into a learning resource and revamping its displays.

Trustees' chair Anne Milan said Mr Dunbar was found through a long search to fill the vacancy left by the death of Stuart Hilton last June. "It's still difficult times for the museum. But it's not as desperate as it was. We still got a small grant from Manchester City Council this year but we rely heavily on donations.The public appeal Stuart started has saved the museum, which is a real tribute to him."

    Last updated: 11:47am, May 20 2011