Why Middle East is the land of the rising Sunnis

By Anshel Pfeffer, December 13, 2012

The identity of some of the foreign generals who attended a secret conference convened last month by Britain’s Chief of Defence Staff General Sir David Richards may seem, at first, surprising.


Labour glammed-up but not hot for power

By Anshel Pfeffer, December 7, 2012

V This could have been Shelly Yachimovich’s week. With a fresh and attractive list emerging from the Labour primaries and the launch of her new economic plan, probably the most comprehensive social and fiscal manifesto ever published by an Israeli party, she should have been well on her way to setting the election’s agenda and re-establishing Labour as a viable political force.


Britain beginning to close its ears to Israel

By Martin Bright, December 6, 2012

It comes to something when Conservative Friends of Israel is forced to issue a statement distancing itself from the position of a Tory-led government towards Israel. But even after the Foreign Office played down reports that William Hague was considering withdrawing our ambassador from Israel over plans to expand settlement building, CFI felt it necessary to issue a highly critical statement.


Bibi needs America, not the Europeans

By Emanuele Ottolenghi, December 6, 2012

Israel has a problem. The E-1 corridor building decision is actually long overdue. Under any future agreement, Maale Adumim would have to remain under Israeli sovereignty – this is a consensus issue in Israel and no prime minister can evict its approximately 40,000 residents without facing a national upheaval.


Joining the Hague court will have implications for Palestinians, too

By Robbie Sabel, December 6, 2012

One of the reasons Israel objected so vehemently to the premature UN recognition of Palestine as a state was the apprehension that the International Criminal Court at The Hague (ICC) would, subsequently, accede to a request by the “state of Palestine” to join the Court. Once accepted as a member state, the Palestinians might then attempt to have Israeli officials indicted.


Arafat: digging up the past hurts the middle east future

By Uri Dromi, November 30, 2012

It was Mark Twain who said of Jane Austen: “Every time I read Pride and Prejudice I want to dig her up and hit her over the skull with her own shin-bone.” Palestinians, on the other hand, are now digging up Yasir Arafat for different reasons — they want to find out if he was poisoned.


Beware the women bishops vote

By Simon Rocker, November 30, 2012

The Church of England found itself the object of widespread anger and derision last week after its governing body, the Synod, narrowly failed to approve the creation of women bishops.

To British Jews, it must seem like another family’s problem. But the fallout may yet have consequences for other faiths.


How we helped justice to prevail in Hackney

By David Lewis, November 29, 2012

Israel’s supporters won a symbolic victory on November 21 against a BDS (boycott divestment sanctions) campaign to prevent Veolia from winning a massive waste services contract for the North London Waste Authority.


UN bid throws party positions into sharp relief

By Martin Bright, November 29, 2012

What a difference a year makes. Last September, Ed Miliband marked a definitive break with his party’s pro-Israel New Labour past by backing the Palestinian bid for an upgrade to their status at the United Nations. At the time this seemed precipitous and naive.


Morsi pulls off an Islamist coup

By John R Bradley, November 29, 2012

Egypt’s President Mohammed Morsi this week pulled off an Islamist coup, issuing a decree banning anybody from challenging any of his personal decisions. He placed himself, and the Muslim Brotherhood (from which he hails), above any kind of independent judicial or legislative oversight, something even deposed President Hosni Mubarak had not dared to contemplate.