Gaza to revert back to Egyptian Control


By Jon_i_Cohen
March 2, 2011
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As the uprisings continue throughout the Arab Middle East, more and more pundits are of the view that Gaza should revet to Egyptian control.

Foreign media continue to try to resuscitate ideas that have been rejected for years. The widely respected Christian Science Monitor on Tuesday published an opinion article by Dashiell Shapiro, described by the newspaper as a “tax lawyer who has worked in the Middle East, who suggested that the uprising in Egypt gives the country an opportunity to take over Gaza.

Egypt ruled Gaza until the Six-Day War in 1967 and has consistently refused to take any responsibility for the crowded and terror-ridden region.

Nevertheless, he reasoned that Gaza Arabs are culturally closer to Egyptian Arabs than those in Judea and Samaria. Admitting that “the idea of returning Gaza to Egyptian control has always been rejected out of hand, mainly by Egypt itself,” he argued that a post-Mubarak regime will feel less threatened by Hamas, especially if the Muslim Brotherhood is part of the new regime.

Further details here:-
http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/142624

COMMENTS

mattpryor

Wed, 03/02/2011 - 12:20

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2 points

I've got a bad feeling about this...


Joe Millis

Wed, 03/02/2011 - 12:29

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-2 points

Ain't gonna happen. St Albans is more likely to revert to Roman control than Gaza coming under Egyptian occupation or Jordan becoming a Palestinian state (or its residents be bribed to move elsewhere). It's pure fantasy.


mattpryor

Wed, 03/02/2011 - 13:07

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2 points

The expert has spoken! Joe Millis says it ain't gonna happen, so there will be no more discussion on the subject!


Joe Millis

Wed, 03/02/2011 - 13:18

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0 points

Mine was merely an opinion, Pryor. But if you want to take it as Gospel, be my guest. But check the facts, apart from some wishful thinking from some far right fringe Israelis (Israel National News is the settlers' news service that even attacks Israel's current Netanyahu-Lieberman government), no one buys Gaza for Egypt and Jordan is Palestine. Apart from anything else, this will just perpetuate the conflict, which is something I am sure you don't want. After all, if Jordan is Palestine, what do you do with the 3.5 million Palestinians on the West Bank (90 per cent of the WB's population), especially since they won't be bribed to cross the river?


mattpryor

Wed, 03/02/2011 - 13:46

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2 points

It's hardly wishful thinking. A pro-Iranian Muslim Brotherhood controlled Egyptian regime with UN legitimacy, allied to Hamas, in direct control of the Gaza Strip? Sounds like a nightmare to me.

Wishful thinking is to think that Egypt will become a peaceful liberal democracy which seeks good relations with its neighbours, including Israel. That's what I'm hoping for, but I haven't found many reasons for optimism.

And you really should try to avoid labelling people / organisations as "far right" because their views do not correspond to your own. I also think that religious Zionists are being treated abysmally by the Israeli government, which is in turn trying to please the "international community".


Joe Millis

Wed, 03/02/2011 - 14:12

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-1 points

The settlers are the far right fringe just as surely as the SWP is the far left fringe. Sorry, but that's the case. The religious Zionists are not treated abysmally by the Israeli government. If anything, they are treated with kid gloves. If the settlers who rioted had been Arabs, the police wouldn't have confined themselves to paint guns or plastic bullets. The problem is that the settlers have been allowed to get away with trouble-making for far too long because they have been protected by successive Israeli governments. Had the government - any Israeli government - dealt with them when they broke the law, then yesterday's scenes might have been prevented. They have always been above the law. And in a democracy, no group should be above the law.
Now for wishful thinking. Some in Israel of a particular political bent do hope that Egypt is having a 1979 moment rather than a 1989 one, because that will give those people a good excuse to avoid making decisions.
Eventually, however, a decision will have to be made. And Jordan is Palestine or Gaza is Egypt will only perpetuate the conflict, since the West Bank Palestinians and the Gazan Palestinians will still be justified in getting self-determination, either with this new, Palestinian Jordan or within the areas where they are a majority.
If you want Israel to continue to be the homeland of the Jewish people, surely you must recognise that without self-determination and independence for the Palestinians, there is no self-determination and independence for the Jews.


Jon_i_Cohen

Wed, 03/02/2011 - 14:54

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5 points

The perpetuation of the conflict as Joe puts it is caused by the continual left-wing nonsense that there should be another Arab State created in the region, they have enough already, 55 Moslem controlled States in the world, one, only one Jewish State.
The Gaza to Egypt and Jordan is Palestine are concepts brought about by every international treaty since 1917, but they have never been implemented, now is the time to implement them and forget once and for all the fanciful notion of another independant Arab State between Israel and Jordan - to agree to such a state now that would be national suicide for Israel.


mattpryor

Wed, 03/02/2011 - 15:16

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4 points

Well, having watched the Louis Theroux documentary the other week I find it impossible to view those people with as much contempt as you seem to. Anyone who is subjected to that much hatred (even from their fellow countrymen, it seems), racism and abuse just for wanting to live somewhere deserves compassion and understanding, at the very least, from anyone of good will.

As for the Israeli police using live ammunition against arab rioters, again you will have to provide examples of this happening if your assertion is to be accepted. Your comparison to the shooting of trespassers in the Gaza-Israel no-man's land are not valid, since that is a war-zone.

Now for wishful thinking. Some in Israel of a particular political bent do hope that Egypt is having a 1979 moment rather than a 1989 one, because that will give those people a good excuse to avoid making decisions.

Again, please provide examples and specifics. This is a rather serious allegation to be throwing around. Which people in Israel are hoping for this? Do you have references to a speech? An op-ed somewhere? Or is this the seeds of yet another "Jewish conspiracy"? You are rather good at starting such rumours here. No doubt I will read this one on the MPAC website in a few weeks!

As for Palestinian self-determination: A fine liberal aim, if I take you on your word that the "Palestinians" are a people in the same way as the Jews are a people. By the same logic, the Spanish have no right to self-determination until they have accommodated the Basques' demands for self-determination, the Turks have no right to self-determination until they have accommodated the Kurds' demands for self-determination, and so on.


amber

Wed, 03/02/2011 - 15:38

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1 point

Given Millis' open hostility to religious Jews in general (remember he wanted to "get rid" of them in Israeli society, and even used terminology used for the promotion of murder, as in "who will rid us of these turbulent priests, a clear reference to Thomas Becket) - it is hardly surprising that he continues his hateful agenda under the cloak of being anti-settlement.


Joe Millis

Wed, 03/02/2011 - 15:47

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-2 points

On that basis, and because of a Louis Theroux documentary, you no doubt have a soft spot for the Westboro Baptist Church people, too. Theroux made a documentary about them too. The settlers have been treated with kid gloves.
In Israel proper, 11 Arabs were killed by the police during protests at the start of the second intifada.
And I suggest you look up Land Day, when Israeli Arabs commemorate those of their number killed when they protested against land appropriation. In Israel, not in the occupied territories.
Read Netanyahu's and Lieberman's speeches re the uprisings in the Arab world. They are laying the groundwork for finding excuses.
That's whataboutery when it comes to others. I'm looking to free Israel from the occupation.


Joe Millis

Wed, 03/02/2011 - 15:50

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-2 points

I suspect Amber wouldn't like it if, say, a bunch of Muslim extremists started rioting in her town with scant regard for the rule of law. If we lose our regard for the rule of law, like the settlers, we lose our claim to being part of the Judaeo-Christian civilisation.


amber

Wed, 03/02/2011 - 18:38

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-1 points

Millis, of course the riule of law should be upheld. Just don't pretend that's your issue here.


Joe Millis

Wed, 03/02/2011 - 18:49

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-2 points

Amber it is precisely the issue here. One rule for all.


Jon_i_Cohen

Wed, 03/02/2011 - 18:49

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5 points

Amber, Joe is right, the rule of law must be upheld.The weekly demonstrations at Ni'Lin and other places alongside the barrier should be stopped and harsh measures taken against the foreign, left-wing, open-toed sandal wearing, activists who perpetuate the weekly "gatherings" to ensure that they are stopped.


Joe Millis

Wed, 03/02/2011 - 18:53

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-2 points

Jon, in case you hadnt noticed, the Israeli police have been using tear gas and rubber bullets at Bilin, where there have been protest against the state's failure to uphold the rule of law (do what the Supreme Court has ruled it must do). What has shocked the settlers is that they were treated like those at Bilin. They thought they were above the law.


jose (not verified)

Wed, 03/02/2011 - 18:58

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-2 points

That would be by far the best thing that could happen to the Gaza Strip...


mattpryor

Wed, 03/02/2011 - 18:59

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5 points

It would be, provided Egypt remains friendly!

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