The Woking Mosque's Founder's Nephew was the True Author of the Balfour Declaration


By Yvetta
November 1, 2010
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This information first came to light in an article in "History Today" in 1999, but since then its author did more investigation in the Budapest genealogical archives, producing a full family tree for the well-known Tory statesman Leo Amery and a much fuller article regarding his attitude to Zionism and Israel.
'The Balfour Declaration – issued 93 years ago this coming Tuesday, 2 November, and in effect the State of Israel’s founding charter – bears the name of Britain’s Foreign Secretary, who signed it in the form of a letter to Anglo-Jewry’s de facto leader Lord Rothschild, who was asked to make its contents known to the Zionist Federation. It was authored not by Balfour but by the political secretary to Lloyd George’s Cabinet, Leopold (Leo) Amery (1873-1955). In October 1917 he was given several unsatisfactory drafts of what became known as the Balfour Declaration and asked to finalise it. To the resulting document the full cabinet (Amery was not a member, his first cabinet post being First Lord of the Admiralty in the “Die-hard” Tory administration of 1922) made only two minor amendments. One altered his promise of a “National home for the Jewish race” – an interesting wording in view of who and what its author was – to “Jewish people”. The other omitted the final seven words of his draft, which spoke of the rights “enjoyed by Jews in any other country who are contented with their existing nationality”.'
To read more:Daphne Anson: The Mosque-Founder's Nephew who drafted the Balfour ...
31 Oct 2010 ... The Mosque-Founder's Nephew who drafted the Balfour Declaration – Leopold Amery, the “Secret Jew”. The Balfour Declaration – issued 93 years ...
daphneanson.blogspot.com/.../mosque-founders-nephew-who-drafted.html
http://www.daphneanson.blogspot.com/

COMMENTS

Avraham Reiss

Mon, 11/01/2010 - 09:08

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'the rights "enjoyed by Jews in any other country who are contented with their existing nationality”.'

Re the above quote, a long time ago someone suggested to me that since Rabbi Kook was 'trapped' in London during WWI, he might have influenced the Declaration.

At one point I spent hours scanning back copies of the JC from the years 1917-1935 (when Rabbi Kook died).

I did not find what I was looking for, but as one who grew up in London I was amazed to find that at the time of the Balfour Declaration British Jewry - as portrayed by the JC of that time - STRONGLY OPPOSED the Declaration.

Although it wasn't stated specifically, reading between the lines I felt that British Jewry was afraid that they would now be told "now that you have your own home - go there!"


Yvetta

Mon, 11/01/2010 - 09:27

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That was a very common reaction - especially among the patricians who controlled the Board of Deputies pre-war.


telegramsam

Mon, 11/01/2010 - 10:23

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Avraham and Yvetta, did you know that the publication of the Balfour Declaration was delayed so that the JC could print it? Also, most Jews in the West opposed Zionism then, seeing it as a way of creating allegations of dual-loyalties. Western diaspora Jewry was happy with its lot, why would it want to rock the boat?


Yvetta

Mon, 11/01/2010 - 10:30

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Yes, there was a lily-livered League of British Jews formed to protest Zionism and profess loyalty to GB; C.G. Montefiore was one of those involved. The inter-war Gentlemen of the Mosaic Persuasion did tend to be "philanthropic Zionists", though, since GB had the Mandate. As late as the Yom Kippur War the AJA, while opposing the Heath Government's refusal to send spare parts to Israel, carefully stressed that their "allegiance" to GB. Must of western Jewry was the same at the time of the B.D.


telegramsam

Mon, 11/01/2010 - 10:35

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It's the same now, Yvetta. Despite professing to be Zionist (although I'm not entirely sure they know what that means), the vast majority of British (and US and French and German and Oz and Kiwi etc) Jews would not want to rock the boat over alleged dual-loyalties.


Yvetta

Mon, 11/01/2010 - 10:48

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More fool them, then!


telegramsam

Mon, 11/01/2010 - 11:00

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I am not sure, Yvetta. Perhaps 70+ years ago, that might have been a problem, but today?


Yvetta

Mon, 11/01/2010 - 11:54

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Yes, it does seem over-sensitive, t'sam. I'm not entirely convinced it's true.

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