Awaiting the other shoe....


By Geoffrey Paul
November 25, 2010
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I had to admit here recently that I do not get out enough, but unless, I am very deaf, I have not heard the echoes in the national media we might have expected after the JC’s comprehensive report of Mick Davis’s critical comments on some Israeli policies. Those reverberations might come yet, of course, and those who put their hands to their lips and urge “not in front of our neighbours,” may still be right. Mr Davis’s words could still be picked up and used against Mr Netanyahu and Israel. But it’s more than a week now and even a fastidious reporter, who did not wish to soil an ear by holding it close to the ground, must have heard rumblings of a communal controversy. Why, even David Milliband has joined in.

So why the silence? We know all the media read the JC by the freedom with which regularly they make off with its scoops. My own theory, still in the process of evolution, is that the newspapers, especially, just do not know how to handle this story. Here is a leader of Anglo-Jewry (and forget the Jewish Leadership Council, his role as head of the UJIA makes him a top leader) who speaks critical thoughts about Israels’ policies - or the potential outcome of those policies - which is not unfamiliar fare in the non-Jewish media. He seems to have the support of many of his peers. But Mr Davis and they remain dedicated to Israel, he most practically by heading the top pro-Israel fund in the land. Whoops! What’s going on here?

It is going to be interesting to see how the press resolves this conundrum. Or maybe they will not even try. And, suddenly, we will find ourselves nonplussed by the fact that it doesn’t really matter what we say in front of our neighbours. They don’t care. Just think what that might follow from that…

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telegramsam

Thu, 11/25/2010 - 19:57

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Exactly, Geoffrey

It is going to be interesting to see how the press resolves this conundrum. Or maybe they will not even try. And, suddenly, we will find ourselves nonplussed by the fact that it doesn’t really matter what we say in front of our neighbours. They don’t care. Just think what that might follow from that…

That is exactly the point. The professional delegitimisers will continue to delegitimise, irrespective of what the community says or does. In fact, irrespective of what Israel says or does.
We need to have a clear, honest, no-holds-barred debate between Israel and the diaspora. First and foremost we need to talk about what we expect from the national home of the Jewish people and what it expects from us. Everything else will flow from there.


Yoni1

Thu, 11/25/2010 - 20:26

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"First and foremost we need to talk about what we expect from the national home of the Jewish people"

If you don't live there, arrogant little man, you have no right to 'expect' anything from it.


telegramsam

Thu, 11/25/2010 - 20:38

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Yoni1, your point about not living there is well made. However, as Israel is the national home of the Jewish people, Jewish people, irrespective of where they live should be able to have a full and frank exchange of views with Israel


jose (not verified)

Fri, 11/26/2010 - 13:52

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I think tspam does not understand fully the concept of citizenship. Maybe he believes that, because some is Jew, that entitles him to having a special right to influence Israeli policies. Well, suppose a person of UK descent, say Australian, came to tell UK citizens that his opinion on what UK should do is as important as if he was himself a UK citizen. Everybody would laugh at him, right?
So the answer is "no". Although Israel is the Jewish state and the natural home of the Jewish people, anyone who doesn't have Israeli citizenship is equal in their opinion, Jew or non-Jew.
They are not Israelis, full stop.

Double standards are a sure sign of antisemitism.

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