Theatre

Review: Macbeth

By John Nathan, February 28, 2013

If there is one compelling idea in director Jamie Lloyd’s urgent, blood-soaked vision, it is that the Macbeths’ plan to murder their king derives from being denied a child.

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Review: If You Don't Let Us Dream, We Won't Let You Sleep

By John Nathan, February 28, 2013

In 2010 the Finborough Theatre staged Anders Lustgarten’s brilliant play about British far-right politics. Called A Day at the Racists, it revealed how the far-right attract the support of white working-class voters; and how neglect by the politically correct left had turned its supporters’ impulse for social justice into resentment against immigrants.

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Review: The Tailor-Made Man

By John Nathan, February 28, 2013

At the core of this new musical is an interesting story about the gay 1930s film star Billy Haines who played romantic leads on screen but made no attempt to hide his homosexuality off it, much to the fury of his formidable studio boss Louis B Mayer.

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Review: Playing Cards 1: Spades

By Paul Lester, February 14, 2013

There is a lot to admire about this technically brilliant offering from renowned French-Canadian director Robert Lepage. For a start, it is a measure of Lepage’s skill that at two and a half hours without an interval, the evening goes remarkably quickly.

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Review: Fiesta (The Sun Also Rises)

By John Nathan, February 14, 2013

Transposing famous novels to the stage presents particular challenges, not least satisfying the expectations of the book’s fans.

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Review: Antony Sher in The Captain of Kopenick

By Alan Montague, February 7, 2013

Categorised by the Nazis as “half Jewish” because his Protestant grandfather was born a Jew, the popular German dramatist Carl Zuckmayer managed to escape the clutches of the Gestapo by moving to America. They got his play though, and banned it in 1933.

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Review: Old Times

By John Nathan, February 7, 2013

Apparently, there is good reason to take up the offer to see Kristin Scott Thomas and Lia Williams alternate in the roles of Anna and Kate. It is said that hidden nuances in Pinter’s 1971 play are revealed. I’m not convinced they are worth the price of two tickets but then, I have seen only one version.

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Review: The Turn of the Screw

By John Nathan, February 7, 2013

This chilling adaptation of Henry James's 1897 novella, in which a governess (Anna Madeley) finds that the two children she has been hired to teach (Lucy Morton and Laurence Belcher) are haunted by the ghosts of dead adults, certainly has the desired effect.

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Review: Rowan Atkinson in Quartermaine's Terms

By John Nathan, January 31, 2013

It is a face that millions around the world have learned to love. Even for the doubters, that gormless expression was a highlight of the Olympic ceremony when Rowan Atkinson played a pianist with the least demanding job in the world.

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Review: Port

By John Nathan, January 31, 2013

Soppy sentimentalist Simon Stephens is at the National. At least, that is how a newcomer to Stephens’s work might see the dramatist after watching this revival of his 2002 play, which features an optimistic pop song and a sunrise. Old hands, by contrast, would have been steeling themselves for the brutality and violence that often characterise Stephens’s works.

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