Theatre

Review: Torn

By John Nathan, July 3, 2008


Arcola Theatre, London E8

This production has been overshadowed by the murder last weekend in North London of Ben Kinsella, whose sister, Brooke, is in the cast.

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Review: Twelfth Night

By John Nathan, July 3, 2008


Open Air Theatre, Regent’s Park, London NW1

“With a hey, ho, the wind and the rain,” sings Clive Rowe’s sweet-voiced Feste as the rain lashed the stage of the Open Air Theatre.

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Review: Mother/Son

By John Nathan, June 20, 2008


Theatre 503, London SW11

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Review: Dov And Ali

By John Nathan, June 20, 2008


Theatre 503, London SW11

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Review: The Chalk Garden

By John Nathan, June 20, 2008


Donmar Theatre, London WC2

It was not enough for Enid Bagnold that Hollywood turned her horsey novel National Velvet into the movie that introduced Elizabeth Taylor to the world. She wanted to write a thoroughbred play too. In 1956 she did — The Chalk Garden, in which a mysterious governess saves a girl from a household as sterile as its eponymous garden.

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Review: Many Roads To Paradise

By John Nathan, June 20, 2008


Finborough Theatre, London SW10

Stewart Permutt is a dramatist who writes with compassion but without the baggage of sentimentality. The people who populate his plays are more likely to reveal disappointment than hope. Yet they win you over, not by appealing to your sympathy but by revealing their humanity.

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Review: Afterlife

By John Nathan, June 12, 2008


Lyttelton, National Theatre, London SE1

Michael Frayn’s new play is stalked by mortality. It comes in the form of Death, the character in the morality play-within-a-play staged by Frayn’s hero, Jewish impresario Max Reinhardt, creator of the Salzburg Festival. And mortality is also present in the form of Muller, the Austrian Everyman, a sinister presence as Reinhardt’s success is matched by that of the Nazis.

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Review: Golda's Balcony

By John Nathan, June 12, 2008


Shaw Theatre, London NW1

It is not hard to see why Tovah Feldshuh received a Tony nomination on Broadway.

It is the Yom Kippur War and Feldshuh’s croaky-voiced Golda Meir cuts a lonely figure puffing on endless cigarettes and grappling with military and moral dilemmas.

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Review: The Revenger's Tragedy

By John Nathan, June 12, 2008


Olivier, National Theatre, London SE1

Although Middleton’s 1606 tragedy centres on one man who is driven to avenge his mistress’s murder, this is a play where many are out to get even. Melly Still’s modern-dress production straddles both 17th and 21st centuries with techno music and voluptuous Renaissance imagery. The revolving set reveals corridors of conspiracy and a debauched court populated with hedonists.

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Review: Hannah and Martin

By John Nathan, June 5, 2008


The Courtyard Theatre, London N1

One of the fainter blips on the fringe radar is host to a terrific production of a remarkably confident debut by American writer Kate Fodor.

Central to her biographical work is the affair between two of Germany’s great 20th-century thinkers. One is Martin Heidegger, the philosopher who flourished under the Nazis, giving the barbarians a veneer of intellectual credibility. The other is Hannah Arendt, his Jewish student who would later carve her own formidable reputation.

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