Theatre

Review: Love’s Labour’s Lost

By John Nathan, October 30, 2008

The Rose Theatre, Kingston, Surrey

First things first. Peter Hall's production is Kingston's Rose Theatre's first home-grown offering since it opened last January; Love's Labour's Lost was the first play to be directed by Hall as the RSC's first artistic director; and Shakespeare's comedy is thought by many to be his first play.

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Review: Laughing In The Dark

By John Nathan, October 23, 2008

New End Theatre, London NW3

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Review: In The Red And Brown Water

By John Nathan, October 23, 2008

The Young Vic, London SE1

Last year young American Tarell Alvin McCraney made an astounding Young Vic debut with The Brothers Size, his lyrical sibling play set in Louisiana.

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Review: Oedipus

By John Nathan, October 23, 2008

Olivier, National Theatre, London SE1

As Ralph Fiennes's Oedpius tries to calm the fearful people of Thebes, you could be forgiven for mistaking him for a more modern, though equally emotionally remote leader attempting to rescue his people in a crisis.

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Review: Sarah Silverman

By Paul Lester, October 23, 2008

Hammersmith Apollo, London W6

When the audience, muttering resentments, spilled on to the street at around 9.15pm, barely 45 minutes after notorious American comedian Sarah Silverman came on stage, one was reminded of that old gag, recounted by Woody Allen in Annie Hall: "The food here is terrible - and such small portions."

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Ohad Naharin: The maverick lord of Israeli dance

By Nick Johnstone, October 17, 2008

When Ohad Naharin was a child growing up on Kibbutz Mizra in the suburbs of Haifa, his dancer mother and psychologist father instilled a love of dance in him. "At home," he says, "we'd always dance."

They took him to the theatre, encouraged his interest in folk dancing. Later, he loved gymnastics and music. Regardless of what he was doing while growing up, there was always a fascination with movement at the forefront of his mind.

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Review: The White Devil

By John Nathan, October 17, 2008

Menier Chocolate Factory, London SE1

The Chocolate Factory specialises in reviving musicals, (Sondheim's A Little Night Music is next), so with this resurrection of Webster's Jacobean revenge tragedy it is branching out.

At the end of this admirably fast-moving production a lone caretaker walks on to the Chocolate Factory's traverse stage and casually mops up the blood.

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Review: No Man’s Land

By John Nathan, October 17, 2008

Duke of York's Theatre, London WC2

Harold pinter's mysterious Hampstead play is no less fascinating now than when he wrote it in 1974. But for this starry revival it seems to have confounded this country's fastest rising director, Rupert Goold.

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Judith Dimant: The woman who puts brilliance on the stage

By John Nathan, October 17, 2008

When the dazzlingly talented novelist Jonathan Safran Foer teams up with the visionary theatre director Simon McBurney to make their first film, it will all be because of Judith Dimant.

"I just knew that Simon and Jonathan would be interested in the same things - where we are going; who we are; identity; migration," says Dimant, reeling off profound, meaning-of-life subjects while sitting at the kitchen table of her house in Kentish Town in London.

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Review: Waste

By John Nathan, October 10, 2008

Almeida Theatre, London N1

A new generation is discovering that Harley Granville Barker was one of the country's most astoundingly astute political dramatists - his work has as much to say about today's politics as those at the beginning of the last century.

Originally banned by the Lord Chamberlain in 1907, Waste has at its core a scandal involving high-lying hero MP Henry Trebell (Will Keen) laid low by an affair and an unwanted pregnancy.

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