Theatre

Review: The White Devil

By John Nathan, October 17, 2008

Menier Chocolate Factory, London SE1

The Chocolate Factory specialises in reviving musicals, (Sondheim's A Little Night Music is next), so with this resurrection of Webster's Jacobean revenge tragedy it is branching out.

At the end of this admirably fast-moving production a lone caretaker walks on to the Chocolate Factory's traverse stage and casually mops up the blood.

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Review: No Man’s Land

By John Nathan, October 17, 2008

Duke of York's Theatre, London WC2

Harold pinter's mysterious Hampstead play is no less fascinating now than when he wrote it in 1974. But for this starry revival it seems to have confounded this country's fastest rising director, Rupert Goold.

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Judith Dimant: The woman who puts brilliance on the stage

By John Nathan, October 17, 2008

When the dazzlingly talented novelist Jonathan Safran Foer teams up with the visionary theatre director Simon McBurney to make their first film, it will all be because of Judith Dimant.

"I just knew that Simon and Jonathan would be interested in the same things - where we are going; who we are; identity; migration," says Dimant, reeling off profound, meaning-of-life subjects while sitting at the kitchen table of her house in Kentish Town in London.

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Review: Waste

By John Nathan, October 10, 2008

Almeida Theatre, London N1

A new generation is discovering that Harley Granville Barker was one of the country's most astoundingly astute political dramatists - his work has as much to say about today's politics as those at the beginning of the last century.

Originally banned by the Lord Chamberlain in 1907, Waste has at its core a scandal involving high-lying hero MP Henry Trebell (Will Keen) laid low by an affair and an unwanted pregnancy.

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Review: The Norman Conquests

By John Nathan, October 10, 2008

Old Vic, London SE1

A country house populated by three sisters and a lovelorn family so cursed with disappointment and disillusionment as to drive its members to despair.

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Review: Memory

By John Nathan, October 10, 2008

Pleasance Theatre, London N7

There will be those who balk at Jonathan Lichtenstein's memory play. It shifts from Berlin in 1990, just after the city's dividing wall had been taken down, to Bethlehem, 2006, just as Israel's security wall is being put up.

It also switches to and from the Nazi theft of a Jewish business in 1930s Berlin to Israel's destruction of a Palestinian's home to make way for the wall.

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Review: The Walworth Farce

By John Nathan, October 3, 2008

Cottesloe, National Theatre, London SE1

The Irish father in Enda Walsh's funny and disturbing comedy tries to rewrite family history by forcing his two sons to perform repeatedly a play version of his life that hides the bloody crime he committed back in Cork.

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Review: Welcome To Ramallah

By John Nathan, October 3, 2008

Arcola Theatre, London E8

Rather like the idealistic do-gooder in her latest offering, Sonja Linden has supported several worthwhile causes, among them victims of the Rwandan genocide, about whom she wrote a fine play. But sometimes there is a dramatic price to be paid when a playwright's politics is so conspicuously present on stage.

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Review: Ivanov

By Jenni Frazer, September 26, 2008

Wyndhams Theatre, London WC2 

Anton Chekhov's Ivanov is generally written off as the young man's early scribblings before going on to the greatness of plays such as The Cherry Orchard and Three Sisters. But in the skilful hands of writer Tom Stoppard and director Michael Grandage, the Donmar's production of Ivanov is a revelation - a hugely intricate West End play which is both comic and tragic.

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Review: Cherry Docs

By Alex Kasriel, September 26, 2008

Wyndhams Theatre, London WC2

 

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