Theatre

Review: Scenes from an Execution

By John Nathan, October 11, 2012

You might say that the National Theatre has done for Howard Barker what, in Barker's play, the Doge of Venice does for the 16th-century female artist, Galactia.

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Review: Three Sisters - it's a Russian revolution as Chekhov is modernised

By John Nathan, September 27, 2012

Anton Chekhov’s masterpiece has been reworked before, and with rewarding results. In 2008, a version by Diane Samuels and Tracy-Ann Oberman set the play in post-war Jewish Liverpool. Instead of yearning to see Moscow, the siblings were in a New York state of mind. And instead of Olga, Masha and Irina, we had Gertie, May and Rita.

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Review: Hedda Gabler - Sheridan Smith triumphant as Ibsen's heroine

By John Nathan, September 20, 2012

It had long been on the cards that Sheridan Smith would complete the transition from frothy TV sitcom to the classical stage. On the way she delivered acclaimed performances, such as her Olivier-winning Elle Woods in the musical Legally Blonde and a cameo as a lonely wife in Flare Path.

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Review: Love and Information - Caryl Churchill offends again, but only against theatre convention

By John Nathan, September 20, 2012

There has probably never been a play quite like it. In almost two uninterrupted hours this new offering by Caryl Churchill propels us through countless short, seemingly unconnected conversations. There is no plot, no setting — but for the giant white cube in which each conversation takes place — and for much of the time the play does not make much sense.

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Review: Jonathan Pryce's King Lear

By John Nathan, September 13, 2012

Did Lear sexually abuse his daughters? In Michael Attenborough’s austere new Shakespeare production, with a splendidly bearded Jonathan Pryce in the title role, there is more than a hint of something dark and inappropriate in Lear’s family history.

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Life of Brian and Beatles

August 30, 2012

A play about the life of Beatles manager Brian Epstein will be the first major production at the Liverpool theatre bearing his name.

Epstein: The Man Who Made The Beatles will chart his rise from running the family furniture business — and later the NEMS music store — to managing the world’s most successful pop group. Issues about his sexuality and Judaism will be covered.

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Review: Miriam Margolyes - Dickens' Women

By Lee Levitt, August 24, 2012

Scrunching up her face as the tipsy, unsteady Mrs Gamp from "Martin Chuzzlewit", and picked out in an austere light on a huge, hard, black chair at the back of the stage as the steely Mrs Pipchin from "Dombey and Son", Miriam Margolyes has lost none of her relish for the works of Charles Dickens.

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Review: Simon Amstell: Numb

By Lee Levitt, August 24, 2012

I came out of Simon Amstell's postmodern take on stand-up comedy rather numb. Not comfortably numb, to borrow from Pink Floyd, but uncomfortably numb.

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Karen's Way: A Kindertransport Life

By Lee Levitt, August 22, 2012

Karen Gershon, the German-born writer and poet, was sent to England as a 15-year-old with her elder sister Lise on the second of the kindertransports in December 1938, after kristallnacht and the wider attacks on the Jews.

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Review: Ghetto

By Lee Levitt, August 22, 2012

Taking on a play about the Holocaust is no easy task, so The Theatre School of Tunbridge Wells in Kent is to be commended for its artistic endeavour in tackling Joshua Sobol's controversial drama.

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