Theatre

Rigoletto

By Stephen Pollard, April 6, 2012

There is one compelling reason to see this revival of David McVicar's 11-year-old production of Rigoletto.

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Master and Margarita

By John Nathan, April 2, 2012

Of all Complicite's book adaptations, Bulgakov's mind-expanding novel is surely the most ambitious.

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Abigail’s Party

By John Nathan, March 23, 2012

Everyone watching Lindsay Posner's powerful revival of Mike Leigh's 1977 play will be shocked by the sheer savagery with which two marriages implode during a suburban drinks party.

The similarities between Abigail's Party and Alan Ayckbourn's slightly older Absent Friends, currently in the West End, is remarkable.

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Moon on a Rainbow shawl

By John Nathan, March 23, 2012

The Trinidad-born Errol John wrote his 1957 play in response to a playwriting competition set up by the Observer critic Kenneth Tynan. It won. John must have been burning to write the play anyway.

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Review: Can We Talk About This?

By John Nathan, March 15, 2012

Do you feel morally superior to the Taliban? The opening line of DV8's verbose dance show is not a particularly provocative question considering that the Taliban routinely go about the business of governance with medieval barbarity. Yet, even at their most strident, the liberal classes in this country are hesitant when it comes to declaring moral superiority over others. Can We Talk About This?

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Opera: Miss Fortune

By Stephen Pollard, March 15, 2012

I cannot recall a new opera being more comprehensively trashed by critics than Judith Weir's Miss Fortune.

It stands accused of almost every flaw an opera can have: a feeble plot, derivative music, a static production, badly drawn characters and a banal libretto.

Yet the reaction from the first-night audience was very warm, with full-throated bravos and cheers.

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Review: All New People

By John Nathan, March 8, 2012

On the evidence of his new play, Scrubs star Zach Braff is a talented writer of dialogue but with little to say about being thirtysomething and living a life that apparently contains little worth living for. Though what he does have to say, he says with wit.

A New Jersey beach house in winter is the setting for this fizzing little naval gazer.

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Jackie Mason: Fearless

By John Nathan, March 1, 2012

To the Jews watching his final farewell show in Britain, Jackie Mason is family.

He may be embarrassing family, the kind of relative you would not want your gentile friend to meet (for, in his view, gentiles are only good for fixing Jew-unfriendly objects such as carburettors), but he is still family.

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Review: The Death of Klinghoffer

By Stephen Pollard, March 1, 2012

John Adams's The Death of Klinghoffer trails controversy in its wake. The eminent musicologist Richard Taruskin has called it antisemitic.

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Review: In Basildon

By John Nathan, March 1, 2012

The working-class play has stormed back on to the Royal Court stage. Romford-born David Eldridge sets his play in the living room of an Essex semi owned by the recently deceased Len, and populates it with Len's mourners - two feuding sisters, the comically named Maureen and Doreen, and Ken, his best mate.

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