Theatre

Review: The Motherf**ker With The Hat

By John Nathan, June 25, 2015

In Stephen Adly Guirgis's hometown of New York, where profanity and prudishness can rub up against one another like subway travellers from the right and wrong side of the tracks, some publications did not use asterisks in the title of Guirgis's ferociously funny play of 2011. Instead, they replaced the entire epithet with a motherf**ker-length hyphen.

The logic of this is worth a moment.

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Review: Oresteia

By John Nathan, June 18, 2015

Every so often theatre is capable of lobotomising that part of the brain that constantly reminds itself of the artifice of drama. And when that happens it can leave a viewer so utterly exposed to the rawness of a moment, a kind of post dramatic stress descends in the aftermath.

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Review: Hang

By John Nathan, June 18, 2015

This short, sharp exploration of capital punishment is by the fearlessly poetic Debbie Tucker Green who has a Pinteresque ear for the staccato rhythms of uncompleted sentences - or ordinary conversation.

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Review: Now This is Not The End

By John Nathan, June 16, 2015

After the last Holocaust survivor dies, it's not unreasonable to suppose that the generation of playwrights that have attempted to write about the subject might also dwindle. But, on current evidence, it looks like a new generation is prepared to take it on, spurred in part by the death of first-hand witnesses.

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Review: The Red Lion

By John Nathan, June 15, 2015

The timing could not be much better. We wait nearly a decade for a new work from Patrick Marber and just as it arrives the FIFA scandal gives what might have been a modest little play about football an unexpected urgency.

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It may be a one-sided play but what's worse is that it's no good

By Josh Glancy, May 28, 2015

The Siege does not make comfortable viewing. It is an angry, loud and hectic play. Five men wield assault rifles, shout, bleed, embrace, argue and dream inside the imagined confines of the Church of the Nativity.

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There's A Guy Works Down The Chip Shop Swears He's Elvis

By John Nathan, May 28, 2015

In 1960 Elvis flew from Germany to the US and en route his plane stopped at the US airbase at Prestwick airport.

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Review: The Beaux Stratagem

By John Nathan, May 28, 2015

The title of George Farquhar's 1707 play refers to the strategy of Aimwell (Samuel Barnett) and Archer (Geoffrey Streatfeild), "two gentlemen of broken fortune" who intend to rebuild it through marriage. Their quarry is an heiress and her sister, even though the former's fortune is inconveniently tied to her husband. More promisingly, that marriage is on the rocks.

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Review: High Society

By John Nathan, May 26, 2015

There is something a little bit brilliant in the casting of Kate Fleetwood in the role of heiress Tracy Lord. Fleetwood was a terrifying Lady Macbeth opposite Patrick Stewart and now here she is on the role most people associate with the gilded Grace Kelly.

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Review: Death of a Salesman

By John Nathan, May 21, 2015

You can argue the toss as to whether Miller's classic is, as Antony Sher and his director (and partner) Gregory Doran claim, the greatest American play. Tennessee William's Streetcar is in with a shout as is O'Neill's Long Day's Journey Into Night. But Salesman's greatness is not in doubt. It's a play that demands as much from its director as from as its actors.

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