Film

Review - Three And Out

By Gerald Aaron, April 28, 2008

(15)

The unlikely story of a London Tube train driver who seeks a would-be suicide to throw himself under his train so that he can claim a bonus from his employers seems a peculiar subject even for a black comedy. And so it turns out to be. Director Jonathan Gershfield does his best, extracting what comedy he can, but the screenplay defeats him. Mackenzie Crook in the lead role fails to makes his essentially unsympathetic character likeable.

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Deception

By Gerald Aaron, April 28, 2008

(15)

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Forgetting Sarah Marshall

By Gerald Aaron, April 25, 2008

(15) Jason Segel appears full-frontally naked on screen and only has himself to blame. He co-wrote this defiantly ribald, immensely entertaining comedy, with producer Judd Apatow, the man behind last year’s hits The 40 Year Old Virgin, Knocked Up and Superbad.

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Travels with my father the 'spy'

By Alex Kasriel, April 25, 2008

Stuart Urban’s film about his dad’s wartime adventures led to some welcome family bonding, he tells Alex Kasriel

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Military DVD film

By Rachel Fletcher, April 25, 2008

A DVD highlighting the Jewish contribution to the armed forces over 250 years has been produced by the Association of Jewish Ex-Servicemen and Women.

The 30-minute film, sponsored by the Pears Foundation, goes from the battles against the French in 1759 to the British Jews who fought in World War Two. It includes rarely seen archive footage and the testimonies of ex-servicemen and women. Five Jews received the Victoria Cross for heroism in the First World War, and three in World War Two.

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‘Tube-suicide can be funny as well as awful’

By Alex Kasriel, April 18, 2008

Director Jonathan Gershfield’s has annoyed the country’s train drivers with his new film comedy.

People diving under trains is not exactly a likely comedic theme, but this grim subject forms the plot of new British movie Three and Out.

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In Bruges

April 18, 2008

(18)

Writer-director Martin McDonagh’s blackly comic debut feature leaves few politically correct sacred cows unstoned. Hitmen Ray (Colin Farrell) and Ken (Brendan Gleeson) have been sent to the medieval Belgian town of Bruges to lie low while they wait to be contacted after pulling off a hit in London. Ken enjoys sightseeing, Ray hates the place, and their constant verbal sparring fuels a highly enjoyable odd-couple relationship.

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Mike Leigh's secret

By John Nathan, April 18, 2008

An illuminating new book on the director of Secrets and Lies and Vera Drake reveals how Habonim helped him

Mike Leigh On Mike Leigh
Edited by Amy Raphael; Faber £16.99

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Happy-Go-Lucky

By Gerald Aaron, April 17, 2008

(15)

It is time to break out the thesaurus for Mike Leigh’s blithe new comedy. It is not just eponymously happy, but also joyous, joyful, cheerful, life-affirming and feelgood, as well as being his finest and funniest film to date. And it is blessed with an unforgettable, deservedly award-winning performance by Sally Hawkins as Poppy, a kooky young primary-school teacher.

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Street Kings

By Gerald Aaron, April 17, 2008

(15)

Alcoholic Los Angeles cop Tom Ludlow (Keanu Reeves) goes to the line and well beyond it to rescue two kidnapped young girls at the start of this hard-edged and bloody thriller. “We’re the police,” he says, “we can do whatever the hell we want.”

Which is exactly what happens when, while being investigated for alleged wrongdoing by cynical Captain James Biggs (Hugh Laurie, doing an enjoyably grumpy riff on his moody medico in television’s House), he seeks revenge and sets out to clear himself.

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