Film

Review: Mirrors

By Gerald Aaron, October 10, 2008

(15)

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Review: Gomorrah

By Gerald Aaron, October 10, 2008

(15)

You need to concentrate watching this violent Cannes prize-winner about the ruthless Italian crime syndicate, the Camorra. Director Matteo Garrone tells his chilling, fact-based story by interweaving five different storylines. The result is a compelling drama that makes American gangster films seem melodramatic by comparison.

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Review: The House Bunny

By Gerald Aaron, October 10, 2008

(12A)

Adam Sandler co-produced this cheerfully coarse comedy which is directed for maximum laughs by Fred Wolf and triumphantly showcases Anna Faris's undeniable star quality. She carries the film as ebullient Playboy Bunny Shelley who, homeless after being ejected from Hugh Hefner's legendary Playboy Mansion, finds a new life as house mother to the socially challenged girls of a failing college sorority. Sophisticated it ain't, but it does entertain splendidly, buoyed by Faris' endearing performance.

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Review: City of Ember

By Gerald Aaron, October 10, 2008

(PG)

Saoirse Ronan proves that out-acting Keira Knightley in Atonement was no fluke with a charming performance here. She plays Lina, the teenage heroine of a fantasy set in the eponymous post-apocalyptic underground city. Ember is facing disaster as the massive generator that powers it starts to fail. Lina and her friend Don (Harry Treadaway) set out to save the city, outmanoeuvring corrupt city officials and other villains.

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Your essential guide to the film festival

By Nick Johnstone, October 3, 2008

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Review: Brideshead Revisited

By Gerald Aaron, October 3, 2008

 (12A)

The key question is this. Does this English Heritage-drenched film of Evelyn Waugh's classic 1945 novel match up to the landmark 1980s ITV mini-series. Regrettably, the answer is no.

Having worked (in a very lowly capacity) on the TV series, I find director Julian Jarrold's film perhaps more faithful to the novel's religious themes, but a much lighter, lesser piece of work, and, compared with the mini-series, seriously under-cast.

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Review: How to Lose Friends And Alienate People

By Gerald Aaron, October 3, 2008

 (15)

There is a great deal to enjoy in this amusing roman à clef based on British journalist Toby Young's best-selling memoir of his rather less than glorious two years as a contributing editor of the prestigious magazine Vanity Fair in New York.

For obvious reasons Young's sardonic story of decline and fall has been smartly fictionalised by screenwriter Peter Straughan.

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Review: The Righteous Kill

By Gerald Aaron, September 26, 2008

 (15)

Robert De Niro and Al Pacino have only ever appeared together in one brief scene in the 1995 crime thriller Heat. Here, though, they share centre-screen in an enjoyable thriller casting them as New York policemen on the trail of the vicious killer who is eliminating villains the law cannot catch.

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Review: I've Loved You So Long

By Gerald Aaron, September 26, 2008

 (12A)

Writer-director Philippe Claudel's gets the best out of Kristin Scott Thomas as the key protagonist of his compelling and affecting drama, cleverly using her usual cold screen persona to superb dramatic effect.

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Review: Appaloosa

By Gerald Aaron, September 24, 2008

 (15) 

Ed Harris, directing his second film, rides on to the celluloid range with the most enjoyable Western since Clint Eastwood set about saving the genre from big-screen extinction.

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