Review: The Imperfectionists

By David Herman, August 12, 2011

Tom Rachman
Quercus, £6.99


Review: Far to Go

By Jennifer Lipman, August 11, 2011

By Alison Pick
Headline, £12.99


Review: Einstein Before Israel

By David Edmonds, August 10, 2011

By Ze'ev Rosenkranz
Princeton University Press, £24.95


How do you feel - and why?

By David Conway, August 10, 2011

Zero Degrees of Empathy
By Simon Baron Cohen
Allen Lane, £20

By Stephen Frosh
Taylor & Francis, £17.99

Simon Baron Cohen relates at the start of his new book how, as a young boy, he was told by his father about the atrocities against the inmates of concentration camps committed by their guards and others.


The Jews in the Secret Nazi Reports on Popular Opinion in Germany, 1933-1945

By David Cesarani, August 1, 2011

By Otto Dov Kulka and Eberhard Jäckel
Yale University Press, £100


Review: Heatwave and Crazy Birds

By Jennifer Lipman, August 1, 2011

By Gabriela Avigur-Rotem
Dalkey Archive Press, £11.99


Review: David Abulafia

By Jane Liddell-King, July 25, 2011

"Human history," observes Professor David Abulafia in the introduction to his brilliantly panoramic, witty, wry and erudite book, "involves the study of the irrational as well as the rational. The roulette wheel spins and the outcome is unpredictable, but human hands spin the wheel."


Review: Childish Loves

By David Herman, July 25, 2011

By Benjamin Markovits
Faber & Faber, £14,99

Lady Caroline Lamb famously called Lord Byron "mad, bad and dangerous to know". How bad? How dangerous? These are the questions at the heart of Benjamin Markovits' trilogy about Byron. Perhaps the biggest surprise about Childish Loves is how different it is from the first two novels. How different and how much better.


Review: Scenes from Village Life

By David Herman, July 15, 2011

By Amos Oz
Chatto & Windus, £12.99

There's a moment in Oz's new book of short stories when a woman comes into the village library and asks for a book by "the Israeli writer that everyone was talking about." There's a long waiting list: she might have to wait two months. "Two months?" she says. "In that time he'll have written another book."'


Review: Chasing Shadows

By Jessica Mann, July 15, 2011

By Fred Burton and John Bruning
Palgrave Macmillan, £16.99

An unsolved murder leads quickly to spies and secret agents, assassination, terrorism, obstructive officials and a doggedly persistent investigator. But Chasing Shadows, through thrilling, is not a thriller. Written by an expert in terrorism and a military historian, it is a factual account of actual events.