Arts features

Pulitzer play turns spotlight on relations with Muslims

By John Nathan, May 20, 2013

T he latest play to win a Pulitzer Prize for drama will be remembered for a long time by those who see it at west London’s Bush Theatre, where performances begin today. And Jewish or Muslim audience members are unlikely to forget it. Disgraced is written by Ayad Akhtar, a 42-year-old American actor, screenwriter, novelist and now dramatist.

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Review: Travels With My Aunt

By John Nathan, May 20, 2013

In Giles Havergal’s amusing adaptation of the Graham Greene novel, four actors in dull suits interchange the role of Greene’s narrator — retired bank manager Henry Pulling — and all the other male and female characters in the gently subversive story.

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Review: The Hothouse

By John Nathan, May 20, 2013

Harold Pinter’s vision has come true. Up and down the land, institutions set up to care for the vulnerable have become callous places of torment. As a series of disturbing reports have shown, in a number of places, residents are at best routinely treated without respect and, at worst, abused. In that sense, real life has overtaken this prescient play.

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Skype’s the limit for revealing radio show

By Anna Sheinman, May 17, 2013

Radio presenter Alan Dein opens our conversation by asking: “So where are you and what are you doing?” I wonder if I should remind him that it is me who should be asking the questions. But then Dein, who fronts Radio 4’s Don’t Log Off, does it so nicely that I’m tempted to let him continue.

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My pilgimage in Poland

By Simon Rocker, May 2, 2013

It had been a while since I had last tasted a slice of boiled gefilte fish. So where better to renew acquaintance with the Shabbat delicacy than one of its lands of origin, Poland? But I was not eating a Shabbat meal.

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Camels? Israeli art is about far more

By Jennifer Lipman, April 26, 2013

At first glance, Gil Shani’s 2006 painting Untitled appears completely abstract, a black expanse with white shapes scattered across it in a seemingly random fashion. But, after a while, your eyes begin to identify the shapes — camels passing through a rocky, desert landscape.

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This one will run and run — Paul, 88, completes 22nd marathon

By Sandy Rashty, April 25, 2013

Completing the 26.2-mile marathon distance is a gruelling task for any participant. To prepare properly requires a lifestyle overhaul, particularly with regard to diet and exercise. But the London Marathon’s oldest competitor, 88-year-old Paul Freedman, takes it all in his accomplished stride.

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It’s thanks for the memory as Lipman takes scientific journey

By Sandy Rashty, April 17, 2013

For the last 15 years of his life, Maureen Lipman’s father Maurice struggled with short-term memory loss and the actress was “afraid it was going to happen to me”. It was the inspiration for If Memory Serves Me Right, a prime time BBC documentary broadcast on Thursday night in which she explored issues of memory and memory loss.

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Gatekeepers director Dror Moreh: Why I had to make this film

By Anne Joseph, April 11, 2013

"I knew I had dynamite on my hands," says director Dror Moreh. He is talking about his Oscar-nominated documentary The Gatekeepers which has provoked wide international debate across the political spectrum since its release. Even Israeli embassies have had to grapple with how to respond to its frank revelations, admissions and insights.

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Is Schindler’s List fatally flawed?

By Nathan Abrams, March 27, 2013

Steven Spielberg’s landmark Holocaust film Schindler’s List celebrates the 20th anniversary of its release next month. An adaptation of Thomas Keneally’s historical 1982 novel, Schindler’s Ark, it recounts the story of Oskar Schindler, a businessman and Nazi Party member who, by the end of the war, had saved hundreds of Jews from extermination.

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